Presentations & Workshops

 

Creative Writing

Creative writing workshops can be tailored for beginner-to-advanced writers, addressing the needs of specific groups. Workshops incorporate interactive exercises to encourage students to develop skills specific to their writing goals. Students engage in various activities to improve ability and inspire confidence within a fun, nonjudgmental environment. Workshops cover fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry, exploring story and poetic elements such as plot, character, voice, dialogue, description, setting, pacing, and point of view. Some of the techniques utilized include:

  • Exploring events in students’ lives as inspiration
  • Exploring writing as a positive outlet
  • Examining situations through multiple points of view
  • Focusing on subject development
  • Developing a story from first draft through final revision

Chris has served as a fiction writing instructor for Writer’s Digest School and has conducted numerous workshops for continuing education programs. Chris offers free single-class workshops to K-12 public schools.

For more information, please contact Chris.

Native American Flute

Educational presentations and musical performances on Native American flute explore the mythology, history, crafting, and music of the ancient and modern versions of the flute, dispelling popular but erroneous information of the flute’s development and true place in history.

Popular mythology portrays the Native American flute as an instrument used solely by men to court women, but the flute was and continues to be an instrument played by both men and women in numerous activities, from simple enjoyment of playing to use in fertility rituals honoring gods of harvest and more.

The presentation includes an overview of existing flute creation myths, flute history and use, crafting and structure information, and performance. Presentation length can be tailored to needs.

Chris is a craftsman and musician of the Native American flute. He has published two books on the history and crafting of the instrument and recorded/released three CDs of native flute instrumentals currently available under the WindPoem title. For more information or to arrange a presentation, please contact Chris.

 


 

Literary Work

Walking after Midnight now available

~ A Vietnam veteran whose mother’s love proves worse than captivity…

~ A musician who employs music to resurrect his dead wife…

 ~ A boy who flees an abusive father to land in a circle of demented faeries…

~ An Iraqi War vet who discovers compassion in a tortured, decaying phooka…

~ A sexual assault victim who burns for her victimizers…

~ An angel, wounded and imprisoned by a father desperate for divine healing of his physically and mentally deformed daughter…

~ A suicidal woman who discovers salvation in a Tokyo street vendor’s box…

More than 30 years in the making, Walking after Midnight is a literary trove, collecting 61 tales of critically acclaimed dark fantasy, southern gothic, science fiction, horror, and mainstream fiction that mine the depths of character–how we fail and triumph, accept and reject others and ourselves, and light the darkest recesses of our souls.

On sale now at Amazon.com in paperback and Kindle formats and soon to be available in paperback through most bookstores. Get a 20 percent discount if you order through Createspace. Use the code NA8BMLHK at checkout.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WmRGAkS6s9M

Hush, Puppy! A Southern Fried Tale

“Who doesn’t love a good children’s book encompassing a sweet message, exquisite, color imagery, and a dog gifted with the ability to whip up southern cuisine! Not only is [Hush, Puppy!] a delightful read of fantasy and enchantment, but [readers] will be astounded by the illustrations provided by Beth Young, who uses brilliant color to enhance the author’s story.” ~ Suzie Canale, Three Lifghts in the Attic book reviews

Ever wonder how fried cornbread came about? I did… Thus begins the story, Hush, Puppy! A Southern Fried Tale,  the fantasy of how an excitable puppy and a tiny baker create the southern treat, hushpuppies. “In celebration of good people and tasty food,” the book is appropriate for all ages, available from most bookstores.

The iBooks version features full print-book layout AND read-along audio, perfect for iPad and other devices.

Beth Young is an award-winning artist with an extensive background in commercial, creative, and instructional art. A specialist in Montessori Method education and state certified in early childhood education, Beth is a full-time elementary art teacher, affording her intimate knowledge of the types of illustrations that appeal most to children.


Big Daddy’s Fast-Past Gadget

It can take a long time to grow up. For Josh, six centuries isn’t enough. Enabled by Big Daddy’s fast-past gadget—a 1966 Mustang—and a device for communicating with the dead, 16-year-old Josh and companion Keala flee into a bizarre future six centuries hence that ends up looking a lot like home.

“Wry wit on socio-political problems … a refreshing look through the eyes of a youngster on the verge of manhood.” ~ MyShelf.com

“A special novel that will captivate readers and linger in the mind.” ~ Two Lips Reviews

“Action alone will keep you reading. The story contains a moral, but will humanity learn its lesson? A fun read.” ~ Coffee Time Reviews

Get your copy today!


 White Trash & Southern

Spanning nearly three decades of C.S. Fuqua’s literary career, White Trash & Southern collects 232 poems—an exploration of life’s challenges and rewards. Download an excerpt.

“With an eye for the particular and an ear for the music of everyday life, C. S. Fuqua shares with readers his brave and lyrical view of human experience. An unflinching examination of the sorrows and joys we experience while moving through the world, White Trash & Southern is a fine collection of poems.” ~ Dr. Wendy Galgan, Editor, Assisi

“White Trash & Southern is an exhaustive book of powerfully emotive poems that explore a lifetime of wounds still present and gaping. By not looking away, by taking stock and inventory of all that we’ve been through, we come to discover that we’ve become strong, hardened, and wise for all of our hardships. This is a wonderful book of poetry, and a fine achievement that will greatly enrich its readers.”~ Devin McGuire, Editor of the Unrorean and author of After the Hunt (Encircle Publications 2013)

“… gritty, insightful, humorous, tragic, and celebratory … begin anywhere, skip around, or read it from back to front … a well-written, coherent collection … however you read it.” ~Jonathan K. Rice, Editor/Publisher, Iodine Poetry Journal


“A poignant, very strongly emotional collection of poems ~ one I intend to return to …” ~ Judith B. Glad, author of Improbable Solution

In 2009, cancer took two friends. Joe had a good job that provided health insurance, but the insurance company refused to fund “experimental” procedures that might have saved his life. Rob was a waiter, working for low wages and tips, unable to afford insurance and not covered by an employee insurance program. Both men experienced inexcusable desperation and suffering–one because he had no insurance coverage, the other because he did. Many of the poems in this collection explore Joe’s experiences over the last year of his life and his family’s experiences the year following his death. All are meant to honor these two friends, both deeply cherished and missed.

Available from most bookstores.

Native American Flute Craft ~ Ancient to Modern

Interest in crafting the Native American flute has grown steadily since the 1980s, but reliable, specific crafting instruction has been as scarce to come by as reliable accounts of its history and development. Now there’s Native American Flute Craft, a fully-illustrated manual for crafting Native American flutes.

In 2012, Cooperative Ink published C.S. Fuqua’s The Native American Flute: Myth, History, Craft, which explores the instrument’s true history and mythology while also providing a section on crafting, geared primarily to experienced woodworkers. In response to suggestions from readers, Fuqua produced Native American Flute Craft, an in-depth manual for crafters of all levels to build the Native American flute, including the ancient Anasazi flute, modern two-chamber flute, drone, contrabass, and more. Easy-to-follow, illustrated instructions provide thorough direction to crafting personalized instruments from a variety of materials, including wood, bamboo, and PVC.

Native American Flute Craft is now available in print and electronic formats.

 


The Native American Flute ~ Myth, History, Craft

Now available through most bookstoresThe Native American Flute: Myth, History, Craft explores the flute’s rich mythology and history to provide a better understanding of the instrument’s true place and function in ancient and modern cultures. The book’s final section provides crafting instructions appropriate for intermediate to advanced crafters.

The Native American flute is popularly known as a “love” flute, an instrument used by males in courting, but it is much more and has been played throughout history by children, women, and men. The commonly accepted mythology of the native flute does nothing but reinforce the negative view of native women as subservient to the male. Take, for example, entries on various internet sites that claim that only men played the flute—no matter the culture or tribe—that its power is completely destroyed by the slightest touch of a woman. Such stories make for appealing chauvinistic myth, but not for accurate history. While hunting and courtship were, indeed, associated with the flute, its uses numbered many more than courting, were more diverse in intent, and certainly were not restricted to the male.

Discover the true history and mythology of the Native American flute and learn to make your own, including the ancient and modern versions.


 Muscle Shoals ~ The Hit Capital’s Heyday & Beyond

From Dexter Johnson’s garage studio to James Joiner’s “A Fallen Star,” Tune Records to FAME and Muscle Shoals Sound studios, Aretha Franklin to the Rolling Stones and the Black Keys, from the beginning to present day—Muscle Shoals: The Hit Capital’s Heyday & Beyond is an updated, expanded version of Music Fell on Alabama, the original book-length history of the Muscle Shoals music industry, first published in 1991, chronicling the cooperation of black and white producers and artists during one of the most volatile times in U.S. race relations, cooperation that produced many of the most celebrated and enduring songs of all time.

Much has been written about the Muscle Shoals music industry and even a movie produced since publication of Music Fell on Alabama, most accounts crediting the area’s phenomenal success to some mystical power divined from the Tennessee River. Myth makes for good drama, but Muscle Shoals: The Hit Capital’s Heyday & Beyond details the true source of the industry’s success: the tenacious determination of talented individuals obsessed with the desire to make a difference in music.

And what a difference they made…


Picture

 Notes to My Becca

“C. Stephen Fouquet writes about his newborn daughter with sensitivity and grace. This is a compelling, honest book.”~ Bob Keeshan, TV’s “Captain Kangaroo”

In 1995, Notes to My Becca introduced a wide audience to the societal trend of at-home fathers. NTMB is a touching, practical look at parenting on the wonder—and anxiety—of becoming a father. All editions are currently out of print, but the book may be offered as a free digital download in the future. If interested, please contact C.S. Fuqua by clicking on the email icon.


TheSwing

The Swing: Poems of Fatherhood

The collection of poems documents intimate moments of the author’s daughter from birth into adolescence, contemplating the challenges, sacrifices, and rewards of parenting, The Swing elicits “thoughts and feelings from many experiences. A must for any (parent).” ~ Willie Elliott for Myshelf.com.

The Swing: Poems of Fatherhood,  Uncial Press, 2008, EPIC winner for Best Poetry Collection.


If I Were, I Would!

Embark on fantastic adventures in a whimsical universe of poetry and art where everything is possible. Explore and celebrate the wonderful and diverse world through imagination!

“…a charming and heart-warming journey.” ~ Joanna Dreiling, M.Ed., reading specialist

“…a feeling of hope and the certainty that happiness and goodness are still out there.” ~ Cynthia Harris, author

If I Were, I Would! is available in trade paperback and digital formats. The audio enhanced iBook, available from iTunes for iPad and other devices, features print-book layout and full read-along audio to assist in vocabulary expansion for young readers. If I Were, I Would! is available in print and other formats digital formats through most bookstores. 

 


 Bibliography

Selected awards & honors

  • The Swing: Poems of FatherhoodUncial Press, 2008 EPIC winner for Best Poetry Collection.
  • “Contact is Everything”: Honorable mention in Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror 19.
  • “Magic”: Best of the Net selection, 2006.
  • “Mama’s Boy”: Honorable mention in Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror 6.
  • “Mama’s Boy”: Year’s Best Horror Stories XXI selection.
  • “Old Lady Campbell, She is Dead”: Honorable mention, 1990 Year’s Best Horror & Fantasy.
  • “The Sharps and Flats Guarantee”: Year’s Best Horror Stories XX selection.
  • “Undertaker II: Drowning”: Honorable mention in Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror 7.
  • “Walking After Midnight”: Year’s Best Horror Stories XIX selection.

 

Novels & Fiction Collections

  • Walking after Midnight, Cooperative Ink, October 2016. More than 30 years in the making, Walking after Midnight is a literary trove, collecting 61 tales of critically acclaimed dark fantasy, southern gothic, science fiction, horror, and mainstream fiction
  • Wolfshadow, Ursa Major Books, Limited edition, January 2016, no longer available. Mass market publication coming from Cooperative Ink in late 2017/early2018. Written with co-author Robert Edward Graham, the character and story’s creator. Rob died two days after we finished the first draft.
  • Big Daddy’s Fast-Past Gadget, Cooperative Ink, 2015. First published by Awe-Struck Publishing in eBook format as Big Daddy’s Gadgets, 2006. Republished in 2011 in paperback and eBook formats by Mundania Press. “For some, it takes a long time to grow up. For Josh, six centuries isn’t enough.” Big Daddy’s Fast-Past Gadget is science fiction social satire, set in present-day Hawaii and six centuries into the future. Available from online bookstores and most local bookstores by order.
  • Hush, Puppy! A Southern Fried Tale, Cooperative Ink, 2013. Ever wonder how fried cornbread came about? I did… Thus begins the story, Hush, Puppy! A Southern Fried Tale, the fictional history of how an excitable puppy and a tiny baker create the southern treat, hushpuppies. Hush, Puppy! A Southern Fried Tale is available in paperback and Kindle formats from Amazon.com and in Nook/ePub format from Barnes & Noble. Full production read-along audio for both print and eBook editions is available as an mp3 download from Amazon.com.
  • Rise Up,  Mundania Press, 2012. C.S. Fuqua’s second collection of short fiction, collecting two dozen short stories that span nearly thirty years of Fuqua’s career, features ghosts and faeries, the macabre and mundane, rich and poor, and distraught and jubilant, exploring the motivations, actions, and consequences that force ordinary people to become extraordinary. Sometimes we recognize evil’s approach; sometimes we don’t. Rise Up explores the consequences. Out of print.
  • Trust Walk, short fiction collection, Mundania Press, 2010. The 35 stories collected in Trust Walk explore the motivations of the human spirit, the qualities that lead us into temptation as well as deliverance, that make even the most ordinary among us extraordinary. The unabridged audio version was published in 2013. Out of print.
  • Butterflies Die, audio novel, Books in Motion, 2001. Currently unavailable.
  • Flight of the Omni, audio novel, Books in Motion, 1998. Currently unavailable.
  • Deadlines, audio novel, Books in Motion, 1998. Currently unavailable.
  • Death in Service, audio novel, Books in Motion, 1997. Currently unavailable.


Poetry Collections

  • Cancer, Cooperative Ink, 2015. A collection of poems celebrating two friends who died from different forms of cancer in 2009.
  • White Trash & Southern ~ Collected Poems, Volume I, Cooperative Ink, 2014. Collects more than 200 previously published poems, spanning three decades of C.S. Fuqua’s writing career.
  • If I Were, I Would!, Cooperative Ink, 2014. (A different version, entitled If I Were, was published in eBook format by SynergEbooks, 2011.) Promoting vocabulary expansion and parental interaction, If I Were, I Would! inspires deeper awareness and respect as it takes readers on an extraordinary ride into imagination. Embark on fantastic adventures in a whimsical universe of poetry and art where everything is possible. Explore and celebrate the wonderful and diverse world through imagination! And if you see the authors there, wave!
  • The Swing: Poems of Fatherhood,  Uncial Press, 2008, EPIC winner for Best Poetry Collection. Poems that document intimate moments of a child from birth into adolescence, contemplating the challenges, sacrifices, and rewards of parenting, The Swing elicits “thoughts and feelings from many experiences. A must for any (parent).” — Willie Elliott for Myshelf.com.


Nonfiction Books

  • Native American Flute Craft ~ Ancient to Modern, Cooperative Ink, 2015. Interest in crafting the Native American flute has exploded since the 1980s, but reliable, specific crafting instruction has been as scarce to come by as reliable accounts of its history and development. In 2012, Cooperative Ink published C.S. Fuqua’s The Native American Flute: Myth, History, Craft, which explored the instrument’s true history and mythology while also providing a section on crafting, geared primarily to experienced woodworkers. In response to the continuing success of that book, Fuqua has written Native American Flute Craft, an in-depth manual for crafting the Native American flute in all its forms, from the ancient Anasazi flute to the modern two-chamber flute, from the traditional to the drone and more. Easy-to-follow illustrated instructions provide thorough instruction on crafting personalized instruments from a variety of materials, including wood, bamboo, and PVC.
  • Muscle Shoals ~ The Music Capital’s Heyday & Beyond, Cooperative Ink, 2014. From Dexter Johnson’s garage studio to James Joiner’s “A Fallen Star,” Tune Records to FAME and Muscle Shoals Sound studios, Aretha Franklin to the Rolling Stones and the Black Keys, from the beginning to present day–Muscle Shoals: The Hit Capital’s Heyday & Beyond is an updated, expanded version of Music Fell on Alabama, the original book-length history of the Muscle Shoals music industry, first published in 1991, chronicling the cooperation of black and white producers and artists during one of the most volatile times in U.S. race relations, cooperation that produced many of the most celebrated and enduring songs of all time.
  • Notes to My Becca, Second Edition, Cooperative Ink, 2013, features an update, new photographs, and expanded entries, offering a touching, practical, and thoughtful look at parenting from a dad’s viewpoint while addressing the miracle, anxiety, fear, and wonder of becoming a parent. Notes documents the fear of a possible third miscarriage, tumultuous extended-family situations, and normal post-birth parenting stress. But more, the book describes the joy of father regarding his new daughter, from first breath to first feedings, first words, and first steps.
  • The Native American Flute: Myth, History, Craft, Cooperative Ink, 2012, separates flute myth from flute fact to provide a better understanding of the Native American flute’s true place and function in history and in today’s culture. The book details the development and use of the native flute by both women and men, as well as the myths that have grown up around its use. The book’s final section provides readers with detailed instruction on crafting both the ancient, end-blown native flute and the modern native flute.
  • Alabama Musicians: Musical Heritage from the Heart of Dixie, The History Press, 2011. Alabama Musicians details the history of “musical” Alabama, from the state’s contributions to folk music, jazz, country, rock and more from the 1800s through the present. The book will also feature  biographies of dozens of Alabama music stars who have had and continue to have profound effects on music, from Pinetop Smith, Michael Graham Allen, Urbie Green, and W.C. Handy to Big Mama Thornton, Ward Swingle, and Hank Williams.
  • Notes to My Becca, First Edition, Fairview Press, 1995, charts a new father’s concerns, feelings, and hopes during his wife’s pregnancy and through the first year of their daughter’s life. The late Bob Keeshan, TV’s “Captain Kangaroo,” wrote, “C. Stephen Fouquet [C.S. Fuqua] writes about his newborn daughter with sensitivity and grace. This is a compelling, honest book.”
  • Divorced Dads: Real Stories of Facing the Challenge, Fairview Press, 1996, is an unusual glimpse into the lives and relationships of some extraordinary divorced fathers, providing an intimate portrait of fatherhood beyond marriage, an exploration and examination of post-divorce failures and successes as “Dad.” Out of print.
  • Music Fell on Alabama, Crane Hill Publishers, 1991; reprinted by New South Books, 2007. The first book-length history of the Muscle Shoals, Alabama, recording industry from its inception through the 1980s. These two editions are now out of print. The content has been updated and expanded, published as Muscle Shoals ~ The Hit Capital’s Heyday & Beyond

Short Fiction

  • “The Addict,” 3PBS Radio, Melbourne, Australia; Rick Kennett, producer; 1986.
  • “All the Brave Soldiers,” Something Wicked, Inkless Media, P.O. Box 15074, Vlaeberg, Capetown 8018, South Africa; Issue #8, Nov. 2008-Jan. 2009.
  • “Ants,” Eloquent Stories (Defunct), Volume 2, Issue 5, June-August 2006.
  • “Big Daddy’s Fast-Past Gadget,” Starsong (Defunct), Rt. 2, Box 260-B, St. Matthews, SC 29135; No. 2, Dec. 1987.
  • “The Bridge,” Widow of the Orchid (Defunct), 2101 Hazel Ave., Virginia, MN 55792-3730; September 1996.
  • “The Bridge,” Bare Bone, 1742 Madison St., Kingsport, TN 37665; Issue 3, December 2002.
  • “Burial Ground,” Cabal Asylum (Defunct), P.O. Box 24906, Denver, CO 80224; Summer 1996.
  • “The Chair,” Southern Beat (Defunct), P.O. Box 11454, Norfolk, VA 23517; Winter 1993-1994.
  • “Chips Man, Act I,” Fright Depot (Defunct), 15519 Domarat Ave., Norwalk, CA 90650; No. 1, Spring 1988.
  • “Contact is Everything,” Bare Bone, 1742 Madison St., Kingsport, TN 37665; Issue 8, 2005. (Honorable mention in Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror 19, 2005, edited by Ellen Datlow.)
  • “Contrition,” Brutarian, P.O. Box 25222,Arlington, VA 22202-9222; No. 39, Summer 2003.
  • “Demons,” Something Wicked, Summer/Fall 2012.
  • “Doing Time,” Tale Spinner, P.O. Box 336, Bedford, IN 47421; Summer 1996.
  • “DTs,” Gas (Defunct), P.O. Box397, Marina, CA 93933; No. 4, Summer 1987.
  • “Eyes of a Child”; Dark Regions, P.O. Box 6301, Concord, CA 94524; Issue 11, Winter 1999.
  • “Eyes of a Child”; The Dark Krypt webzine, C.L. Carnley, Editor; January/February 2006.
  • “Garbler,” Serendipity (Defunct), 4295 Silver Lake Road, Pinson, AL 35126-3307; Vol. 1, No. 1, Oct. 1988.
  • “Glass Displays,” Collages & Bricollages, P.O. Box 360, Shippenville, PA 16254; Issue 15, 2002.
  • “Graduation,” Grue, P.O. Box 370, Times Square Station, New York, NY 10108; No. 12, Winter1991. Also appeared in the on-line magazine Creatio Ex Nihilo, April 1997.
  • “Hope,” Cabal Asylum, P.O. Box 24906, Denver, CO 80224; 1998.
  • “Hunting,” Pinehurst Journal, P.O. Box 360747, Milipitas, CA 95036; Spring 1992.
  • “Hurricane,” Theme of Absence, June 6, 2015; includes author interview.
  • “Interview with the Witch,” Cyber-Psychosis Aod; P.O. Box 581, Denver, CO 80201; Issue 3, February 1993.
  • “Interview with the Witch,” Goblin Muse webzine (Defunct), Australia; Issue 2, 2000.
  • “Interview with the Witch,” 3PBS Radio, Melbourne, Australia; Rick Kennett, producer; 1989.
  • “Kid Stuff,” Shock Treatment, Peak Output Press, Box 325, Stacyville, IA 50476; Anthology,1988.
  • “The Last Mystic,” Today’s Fantasy/Future Technology, 5111 Hillrose Drive, Baxter, TN 38544; March/April 1992.
  • “Liberation,” Midnight Zoo, 544 Ygnacio Valley Road, #A273, P.O. Box 8040, Walnut Creek, CA,94956; Vol. I, Issue 3, May/June 1991.
  • “Luau,” Deathrealm, 3223-F Regents Park, Greensboro, NC 27405; No. 5, Spring 1988.
  • “Magic,” Cezanne’s Carrot, P.O. Box 6037, Santa Fe, NM 87502; Summer Solstice edition, July 2006.
  • “Magic,” Best of the Net selection, 2006, Jaimee Wriston Colbert, 2006 judge; Erin Elizabeth Smith, editor; 501 S. Elm St #1, Champaign IL 61820.
  • “Mainstream,” The Provo Canyon Review, Volume 2, Issue 2.
  • “Mama’s Boy,” Cemetery Dance, P.O. Box 18433, Baltimore, MD 21237, Spring 1992. (Honorable mention in Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror 6, edited by Ellen Datlow.)
  • “Mama’s Boy,” Internet electronic magazine Knightmares, an MDG Publications publication; April-May 1997.
  • “Mama’s Boy,” Year’s Best Horror Stories XXI, edited by Karl Edward Wagner, Box 1064, Chapel Hill, NC 27514; October 1993.
  • “Modesto 60,” Co-authored with Michael Kelly; Thirteen Stories, c/o Twilight Writers,102-1111 Jervis Street, Vancouver, BC CANADA V6E 2C5; Issue 10, June 2003.
  • “Obon,” The Big Book of Erotic Ghost Stories, hardback, Suspect Thoughts Press, 2215-R Market Street PMB #544, San Francisco, CA 94114-1612, on behalf of Bookspan and Venus Book Club; 2004.
  • “Obon,” The Big Book of Erotic Ghost Stories, trade paperback, Suspect Thoughts Press on behalf of Blue Moon Books, Avalon Publishing Group Incorporated, 245 West 17th St., New York, New York; 2005.
  • “The Occasional Demon,” Terminal Fright, P.O. Box 100, Black River, NY 13612; Number 6, 1994.
  • “The Occasional Demon,” Three Lobed Burning Eye3LBE; online issue 7; Three Lobed Burning Eye, annual print edition; 1918 NE 48th Ave., Portland, OR97213; Annual Volume II, December 2004.
  • “Old Lady Campbell, She is Dead,” 2AM, P.O. Box 6754, Rockford, IL 61125-1754; No. 12, Summer 1989. (Honorable mention, 1990 Year’s Best Horror & Fantasy, edited by Ellen Datlow.)
  • “Old Lady Campbell, She is Dead,” Gothic.net webzine, 431 Holloway San Francisco, CA 94112; 2003.
  • “The Pinpoint Tune,” Over My Dead Body!; P.O. Box 1778, Auburn, WA 98071-1778; Vol. 2, Issue 4, Spring 1994.
  • “The Pinpoint Tune,” Writers On The River, Mid-South Writers’ Association, Memphis, TN; 1994 issue.
  • “Playing the Notes,” Cabal Asylum, P.O. Box 24906, Denver, CO 80224; Summer 1996.
  • “Poker Face,” Short Story Digest, P.O. Box 1183, Richardson, TX 75803; No. 8, Nov. 1992.
  • “Primal Therapy,” Onionhead Literary Quarterly, 115 N. Kentucky Ave., Lakeland, FL 33801; April 1991.
  • “Reconciliation,” Sounds Of The Night, Sam’s Dot Publishing, P.O. Box 782, Cedar Rapids, IA 52406; August 2010.
  • “The Recruitment,” Midnight Zoo, 544 Ygnacio Valley Road, #A273, P.O. Box 8040, Walnut Creek, CA, 94956; Vol. 1, Issue 5, December 1991.
  • “Redemption,” Ashe Journal, P.O. Box 363, Hulls Cove, ME; spring 2010.
  • “Responsibility,” Space And Time, 138 W. 70th St., Apt. 4B, New York, NY 10023-4432; Issue 86, July 1995.
  • “Rise Up,” A Sharps & Flats tale; Bull Spec, P.O. Box 13146, Durham, NC 27709; Issue 1, 2010, cover story.
  • “Rise Up,” read by Jonathan Danz, Tales to Terrify 184, 2015.
  • “Sack Man,” Alternate Realties webzine (Defunct); May/June 2002.
  • “Sack Man,” The Edge, P.O. Box 341, Marion, MA 02738; Number 5.
  • “Samaritan,” Crossroads, 478 Waters Road, Jacksonville, NC 28546-9756; February 1996.
  • “Scream of the Panther,” Haunts, P.O. Box 3342, Providence, RI 02906; No. 15, Spring 1989.
  • “Screamer,” Fear on Demand podcast; 2014.
  • “Screamer,” The Horror Show, 14848 Misty Springs Lane, Oak Run, CA 96069; Summer 1986.
  • “Screamer,” 3PBS Radio, Melbourne, Australia; Rick Kennett, producer; 1986.
  • “Screamer,” 100 Lightnings, edited by Stephen Studach, Paroxysm Press, Sydney, Australia; 2012.
  • “The Sharps and Flats Guarantee,” Atopos, 233 Lazy Acre Road, Wausau, WI 54401; No. 1, Winter 1991.
  • “The Sharps and Flats Guarantee,” Knightmares, an MDG Publications publication; Volume 7, No. 2, November-December 1997.
  • “The Sharps and Flats Guarantee,” Quick Chills II, 22910 Summit Road, Los Gatos, CA 95030; January 1992.
  • “The Sharps and Flats Guarantee,” Year’s Best Horror Stories XX, edited by Karl Edward Wagner, Box 1064, Chapel Hill, NC 27514; October 1992.
  • “Sibling Rivalry,” Hardboiled Detective, P.O. Box 209, Brooklyn, NY 11228; No. 10, 1990.
  • “Side-Road Shack,” Nøctulpa, P.O. Box 5125, Long Island City, NY 11105; No. 1, 1987.
  • “The Simple Sound of Dead Trees Singing,” Co-authored with Michael Kelly, All Hallows, Ghost Story Society, PO. Box 1360, Ashcroft, British Columbia, Canada V0K 1A0; Issue 42, 2007.
  • “The Stain,” Barbaric Yawp, 3700 County Route 24, Russell, NY 13684; March 2001.
  • “The Tenor’s Wife,” Shock Treatment, Peak Output Press, Box 325, Stacyville, IA 50476; Anthology, 1988.
  • “Time Now,” Queered Fiction Science Fiction Anthology; P.O.B. 732, Gillitts, 3603, KZN, South Africa; September 2009.
  • “Towels,” Arabesques, Agence de Presse et de Communications, Société Arabesque, Case Postale 75, Ctr. de TRI, Chlef 02000, Algeria; August 2006.
  • “Trust Walk,” Grue, P.O. Box 370, Times Square Station, New York, NY 10108; No. 8, 1988.
  • “Trust Walk,” Sounds Of The Night, Sam’s Dot Publishing, P.O.B. 782, Cedar Rapids, IA. 52407; August 2009.
  • “Undertaker I: Ashes and Dust,” Rictus, 2712 Wisconsin Ave. NW #408, Washington, DC 20007; No. 7, 1996.
  • “Undertaker II: Drowning,” Cyber-Psychosis Aod, P.O. Box 581, Denver, CO 80201; No. 7, Autumn 1997. (Honorable mention in Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror 7, edited by Ellen Datlow.)
  • “The Urinal,” Bohemian Chronicle, P.O. Box 387, Largo, FL 34649-0387; February 1994.
  • “Walking After Midnight,” Figment, P.O. Box 3566, Moscow, ID 83843-0477; No. 5, October 1990.
  • “Walking After Midnight,” DAW Books’ Year’s Best Horror Stories XIX, edited by Karl Edward Wagner, Box 1064, Chapel Hill, NC 27514; October 1991.
  • “Walking After Midnight,” Dunesteef audio podcast; http:/www.dunesteef.com; 2010.
  • “Walking After Midnight,” online magazine Other Dimension (Defunct); March 21, 2002.
  • “What We Do,” Big Pond Rumours, P.O. Box 182, Acton, Ontario, Canada L71 1117, Volume 2, Issue 7, March 2007.
  • “When I See You Again,” Space And Time, 138 W. 70th St., Apt. 4B, New York, NY 10023-4432; Issue 83, Spring 1994.

Poetry
[Duplicate titles, in most cases, refer to different works.]

  • “2 Haiku,” Birmingham Arts Journal, Birmingham, AL; July 2012.
  • “21st Century Politics,” Boston Poetry, June 2013.
  • “A Dime’s Worth,” Elk River Review, 606 Coleman Ave., Athens, AL 35611-3216; Autumn 1992.
  • “Absentminded,” The Muse, Winter 2013; purchase the international collection, published in India, here.
  • “The Accident,” Late Knocking, P.O. Box 336, Forest Hill, MD 21050; Vol. V, No. 1, October 1991.
  • “Acts of Importance,” Askew Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 559, Ventura, CA 93002, final edition, 2017.
  • “Aeroplane,” Fowl Feathered ReviewFebruary 2018.
  • “After the Fact,” Boston Poetry, June 2013.
  • “Afterbirth,” Abbey, 5360 Fallriver Row Court, Columbia, MD 21044; Issue 72, March 1994.
  • “Against the Fence,” The Screech Owl, October 2012.
  • “Age,” HouseboatAugust 2015.
  • “Age,” Writing Raw, July 2015.
  • “Aging,” Poetry Super Highway, March 3-8, 2015
  • “Air,” Bogg, 422 N. Cleveland St., Arlington, VA 22201-1424; 2008.
  • “All Part of It,” Chrysalis, Box 812, Holualoa, HI 96725; October 1991.
  • “Always?,” Poultry Broadside, Gunch Press, P.O. Box 544, Yellow Springs, OH45387; Issue No. 4, December 2005.
  • “And Music For Jeff,” Chrysalis, Box 812, Holualoa, HI 96725; October 1991.
  • “And The Wife,” Oasis, P.O. Box 626, Largo, FL 34649-0626; March-April 1993.
  • “Another Drunk,” Abbey, 5360 Fallriver Row Court, Columbia, MD 21044; Issue 76, August 1995.
  • “Another Parental Death,” Draconian Measures, 473 14th St., #A, San Francisco, CA 94103; Issue 2, 1990.
  • “Anyone,” The Poetry Peddler, Box 250, West Monroe, NY 13167; Volume 2, No. 6, October, 1990.
  • “Apologies,” Stuff, 546 Clairmont Circle, Apt. 3, Decatur, GA 30033; No. 9, July 1994.
  • “Armageddon Sky,” Mind in Motion, P.O. Box 1118, Apple Valley, CA 92307; Issue 19, Autumn 1989.
  • “Armageddon Sky,” Dark Metre, United Kingdom; January 2012.
  • “Ashes,” Chiron Review, Rt. 2, Box 111, St. John, KS 67576; Vol. Xiii, Issue 3, Autumn 1994.
  • “As I Imagined,” Fennel Stalk, 2448 W. Freeway Lane, Phoenix, AZ 85021; No. 6, 1988.
  • “Astral Dance,” Cokefish, P.O. Box 683, Long Valley, NJ 07853; Volume 1, No. 7, 1990.
  • “Atalanta’s Legacy,” Omnific, Star Route, Box 21AA, Artemas, PA 17211; Vol II, No. 3, 1990.
  • “Atalanta’s Legacy,” The Triskelion (now defunct); No. 3, 1989.
  • “At 16,” The Poetry Peddler, Box 250, West Monroe, NY 13167; October 1989.
  • “At Some Point,” Misfit Magazine, Fall 2016.
  • “at the point of too far,” Poetry Forum, 5713 Larchmont Drive, Erie, PA 16509; Winter 1990.
  • “At the Tire Shop,” Main Street Rag, P.O. Box 25331, Charlotte, NC 28229-5331; Vol. 8, No. 1, Spring 2003.
  • “At 30,” Omnific, Star Route, Box 21AA, Artemas, PA 17211; Issue 14, October 1992.
  • “At This Distance,” Lactuca, P.O. Box 621, Suffern, NY 10901; Issue 15, March 1992.
  • “At 12,” Piedmont Literary Review, P.O. Box 3656, Danville, VA 24543; Vol. 10, No. 3, Winter 1986.
  • “Authority Challenged,” Ink, Sweat, & Tears, March 2016.
  • “Bass,” Poet Magazine, Box 54947, Oklahoma City, OK 73154; Summer 1991.
  • “The Bayou at Your Back Door,” Confetti, Peak Output Press, P.O. Box 325, Stacyville, IA 50476; 1988.
  • “Beach,” CaKe, A Journal OF Poetry & Art, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL; 2010.
  • “The Beat,” RE:AL, The Journal of Liberal Arts, College of Liberal Arts, Stephen F. Austin State University, Box 13007-Sfa Station, Nacogdoches, TX 75962; Issue 30.2, Fall/Winter 2005.
  • “Beauty,” Wilderness House Review, 145 Foster St., Littleton, MA 01460; No. 6.2, 2011.
  • “Becoming,” Lime Green Bulldozers, P.O. Box 4333, Austin, TX 78765; 1998.
  • “Between Friends,” Stuff, 546 Clairmont Circle, Apt. 3, Decatur, GA 30033; No. 9, July 1994.
  • “The Bird,” Oasis, P.O. Box 626, Largo, FL 34649-0626; March-April 1993.
  • “Bleep,” Chiron Review, 522 E. South Ave., St. John, KS 67576; 2011.
  • “Bonnie’s Garden,” Thrift Poetic Arts Journal, 2541 Commonwealth Ave., Charlotte, NC28205; Issue 2, March 2003.
  • “Bottom of the Glass,” Impetus, 4975 Comanche Trail, Stow, OH 44224; Male 1, Jan. 1989.
  • “Boundless,” Main Street Rag, P.O. Box 25331, Charlotte, NC 28229-5331; 2007.
  • “Brother and Sister,” Fauquier Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 68, Bealeton, VA 22712; October 2000.
  • “Bruise Me,” amulet, P.O. Box 884223, San Francisco, CA 94188; San Francisco, CA; July 2010.
  • “Bruised,” The Vein Literary Magazine, October 2012, number XII.
  • “Bumpers” in The Poetry Bus, Ireland; PB5, 2014. Issue includes CD of poets reading their work.
  • “Burial Ground,” Williwaw, P.O. Box 607, Brockport, NY 14420, Vol. 2, No. 1, Winter 1989.
  • “Business,” Mobius, P.O. Box 674, St. Clair Shores, MI 48080; Spring-Summer, 1995.
  • “Buzzard,” Powhatan Review, 4936 Farrington Drive, Virginia Beach, VA23455; Winter 2006.
  • “Cabinet,” Green Zero; 416 N. Duke St., #7; Lancaster, PA 17602; Issue 3, 1990.
  • “The Calm,” Spirits, Indiana University Northwest’s literary magazine; Indiana University Northwest, Gary, IN 46408; Spring 2010.
  • “Candy that Wayne,” Kalyna ReviewMarch 2016.
  • “Career,” Abbey, 5360 Fallriver Row Court, Columbia, MD 21044; 2013.
  • “Carmel,” Hunger Magazine; P.O. Box 505, Rosendale, NY 12472; 2000.
  • “Catch Phrase,” The Green Muse (defunct), Canada; July 2006.
  • “Celebration,” Moronic Ox, September 2016.
  • “Celluloid,” The Poetry Peddler, Box 250, West Monroe, NY 13167; August 1991, Vol. 2, Issue 4.
  • “Changes,” Artistica literary magazine; Issue 2, 2012.
  • “The Chant,” Rattle, 13440 Ventura Blvd. #200, Sherman Oaks, CA 91423; Issue 14, 2000.
  • “Cheap Grace,” Lunarosity Literary Magazinehttp://www.zianet.com/lunarosity; Spring 2010.
  • “Child and Man,” Illya‘S Honey, P.O. Box 225435, Dallas, TX 75222-5435; Vol. 5, No. 2, 1999.
  • “Choshi,” Bohemia, Waco, TX; July 2012.
  • “Churning,” Thorny Locust, P.O. Box 32631, Kansas City, MO 64171; August 1998
  • “Closets,” Devil Blossoms, P.O. Box 5122, Seabrook, NJ 08302-3511; Number 3, 1999.
  • “Closets,” If Poetry Journal, Rockville, MD., Issue 2, Nov. 2008.
  • “Collectible” in The Milo Review, Fall 2014, print & online.
  • “Compromise,” Thrift Poetic Arts Journal, 2541 Commonwealth Ave., Charlotte, NC28205; Issue 4, 2004.
  • “Connected,” Fade Poetry JournalJuly 2011 & in the first year collection, 2012.
  • “Connecting Lots,” Chiron Review, Rt. 2, Box 111, St. John, KS 67576; Vol. Xiii, No. 2, Summer 1994.
  • “Counselor’s Office” poem in Aji Literary Magazine, August 2014
  • “Counting Change,” Chrysalis, Box 812, Holualoa, HI 96725; March 1991.
  • “Cows,” Event Horizon Magazine, Issue 3, March 2018.
  • “Crane,” Erete‘S Bloom, 2980 Cathedral Drive, Tallahassee, FL32310; Spring 2003, No. 3.
  • “Crane,” In the Eye anthology by Thunder Rain Publishing Corp., P.O. Box 87 Alamogordo, NM 88311-0087; 2007. Proceeds from this anthology went to “Habitat for Humanity” to benefit those affected by Hurricane Katrina.
  • “Cronkite’s Nightmare,” Pudding Magazine; Winter 2013.
  • “Crow,” The Green Muse (defunct), Canada; July 2006.
  • “Currents Scattering,” Piedmont Literary Review, P.O. Box 3656, Danville, VA 24543; Vol. XVI, No. 3, March 1993.
  • “Dadhood,” Stuff, 546 Clairmont Circle, Apt. 3, Decatur, GA 30033; No. 9, July 1994.
  • “The Dark Side,” Up Against The Wall Mother, 6009 Edgewood Lane, Alexandria, VA 22310; Vol. Viii, No. 3, July 1987.
  • “Darts,” Devil Blossoms, P.O. Box 5122, Seabrook, NJ 08302-3511; Number 3, 1999.
  • “Daughters,” Pearl, 3030 E. Second St., Long Beach, CA 90803; 1997.
  • “The Day the Trailer Park Vanished,” The Macguffin, Schoolcraft College, 18600 Haggerty Road, Livonia, MI 48152; April, 1997.
  • “Debating the Problem of Simple Sores,” Blank Gun Silencer, 1240 William St., Racine, WI 53402; 1997.
  • “Decisions,” Words, Pauses, Noises, January 2015.
  • “Deep Space,” Protea Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 876, Sutter Creek, CA 95685; Issue 5, Spring 1990.
  • “The Deepest Part,” Backspace, 25 Riverside Ave., Gloucester, MA 01930-2552; Fall, 1997.
  • “Deja Vu,” Event Horizon Magazine, Issue 3, March 2018.
  • “Denial,” Misfit Magazine, Fall 2015.
  • “Diamond,” Stuff, 546 Clairmont Circle, Apt. 3, Decatur, GA 30033; No. 9, July 1994.
  • “Dimming Wit,” Poetry Super Highway, March 3-8, 2015
  • “Directions,” Crack the Spine; Issue 35, July 2012.
  • “Discipline,” Blood And Fire Review, P.O. Box 89, Cassville, GA 30123; Volume II, Issue II.
  • “Distracted,” Perceptions, Mt. Hood Community College, 26000 SE Stark St., Gresham, OR 97030; Summer 2011.
  • “The Drunk,” Minnesota Ink, P.O. Box 9148, N. St. Paul, MN 55109; July/August 1991.
  • “Driving with James,” Onionhead Literary Quaraterly, 115 North Kentucky Ave., Lakeland, FL 33801; January-April Issue, 1997.
  • “Dragster,” Busting and Droning Magazine, March 2014
  • “Dream,” Busting and Droning Magazine, March 2014.
  • “Drought,” Erete‘S Bloom, 2980 Cathedral Drive, Tallahassee, FL32310; Summer 2003, No. 4.
  • “Education — For Tegan, Age 7,” Lonzie‘S Fried Chicken, P.O. Box 189, Lynn, North Carolina 28750; Issue 3, 1998.
  • “Emeute,” Chiron Review, Rt. 2, Box 111, St. John, KS 67576; Vol. Xiii, No. 2, Summer 1994.
  • “Encounters,” Subtle Tea; September 2005.
  • “End,” Fowl Feathered ReviewFebruary 2018.
  • “Enemies,” MillerPond, RR 2 Box 241, Middlebury Center, PA 16935; 1999.
  • “Escalator,” Abbey, 5360 Fallriver Row Court, Columbia, MD 21044; Issue 122, June 2010.
  • “Evil,”Busting and Droning Magazine, March 2014.
  • “Expertise,” Misfit Magazine, Fall 2015.
  • “Eyes Wide,” Event Horizon Magazine, Issue 3, March 2018.
  • “Fade,” PoetryRepairs.com, Fall 2015.
  • “Fairytales,” Grub Street, Towson University’s Literary & Arts Magazine, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252; 2012.
  • “Faith,” Words, Pauses, Noises, January 2015.
  • “Familiarity,” Thirteen Poetry Magazine, Box 392, Portlandville, NY 13834; Vol. IX, No. 3, April 1991.
  • “Father’s Day,” Stuff, 546 Clairmont Circle, Apt. 3, Decatur, GA 30033; No. 9, July 1994.
  • “Feed,” HouseboatAugust 2015.
  • “Feed,” Writing Raw, July 2015.
  • “The Final Stroke,” Protea Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 894, Pine Grove, CA 95665; Vol.7, Spring 1991.
  • “The First Stroke,” Raw Bone, P.O. Box 120661, Nashville, TN 37212; No. 11, June 1988.
  • “Flesh and Blood,” River Poets Journal, Lambertville, NJ; Spring 2009.
  • “Flight,” In Concert, Peak Output Press, P.O. Box 325, Stacyville, IA 50476; 1989.
  • “Flyer,” Askew, P.O. Box 559, Ventura, CA 93002; Issue #9 Fall/Winter 2010.
  • “Flying,” The Village Idiot, P.O. Box 66, Harrison, ID 83833-0066; 1 April 1990.
  • “The Following Days,” Gertrude, P.O. Box 83948, Portland, OR 97283; Winter 2008.
  • “For a Moment, I Shall,” Poetic Voices, P.O. Box 1684, Durant, OK 74702-1684; September 2000.
  • “For Angie, Waving,” The Village Idiot, P.O. Box 66, Harrison, ID 83833-0066; 1 April 1990.
  • “For Cathy, Growing,” Vice Versa, P.O. Box 10432, Chicago, IL 60610-0432; Vol. 4, No. 1., 1989.
  • “For No One,” In Concert, Peak Output Press, P.O. Box 325, Stacyville, IA 50476; 1989.
  • “For the New Order,” Chrysalis, Box 812, Holualoa, HI 96725; October 1991.
  • “Fort Morgan,” Chili Verde Review, Box AL, 1 Camino Santa Maria, San Antonio, TX 78228-8608; Fall 1998.
  • “Full Coverage,” UP Dare?, P.O. Box 100, Shartlesville, PA 19554; January 1999.
  • “Fumble into Fancy,” The Green Muse (defunct), Canada; July 2006.
  • “The Gaza Zoo,” Delinquent, 92 Elm Road, Kingston, Surrey, KT2 6HU; Issue 15, 2011.
  • “Genealogy,” Fowl Feathered ReviewFebruary 2018.
  • “Generations,” Wandering Hermit Review, 317 Harvard Ave. E, #B, Seattle, WA98102; Issue 2, April 2006.
  • “God,” Tight, P.O. Box 1591, Guerneville, CA 95446; Vol.3, Issue 3, 1992.
  • “Goodbye,” The Green Muse (defunct), Canada; July 2006.
  • “Grains,” Falling Star Magazine, Mcgee4468@aol.com, Los Angeles, CA.; Summer 2007.
  • “The Grand Illusion,” The Blind Mans Rainbow, P.O. Box 18219, Denver, CO 80218-0219; Fall 2002.
  • “Growing,” Iodine, P.O. Box 18548, Charlotte, NC28218-0548; Spring 2003.
  • “Gulls,” Tripwire, P.O. Box 5122, Seabrook, NJ 08302-3511; Number 4, 2000.
  • “Gulls,” The Plastic Tower, P.O. Box 702, Bowie, MD 20718; Number 34, 2000.
  • “Harmony,” The Rockford Review, 7721 Venus St., Loves Park, IL61111; Winter 2004-2005.
  • “Harvest,” Mind in Motion, P.O. Box 1118, Apple Valley, CA 92307; Issue 9, Spring 1987.
  • “Have patience,” ZiggyZag Arms Poetry Journal, February 2017.
  • “He Said Wishes are as Good as Prayers, but His Friend Has Walked a Thousand Dreams,” U.S. 1 Worksheets, U.S. 1 Poets’ Cooperative, P.O. Box 127, Kingston, NJ08528; Volume 51, Spring 2006.
  • “Hidden Inside,” Protea Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 894, Pine Grove, CA 95665; Vol. 7, Spring, 1991.
  • “His Bed,” Kalyna ReviewMarch 2016.
  • “History,” The Screech Owl, October 2012.
  • “Holes,” Fauquier Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 68, Bealeton, VA 22712; October 2000.
  • “Holiday Traffic,” Inky Blue, P.O. Box 385, Comptache, CA 95427; December 1991.
  • “Holidays,” Chiron Review, Rt. 2, Box 111, St. John, KS 67576; Issue 48, Autumn 1996.
  • “Holy Days,” Not One of Us 23, 12 Curtis Road, Natick, MA 01760; Spring 2000.
  • “Home Movies,” The Green Muse (defunct), Canada; July 2006.
  • “Houses,” Event Horizon Magazine, Issue 3, March 2018.
  • “Hunchback,” Chiron Review, Rt. 2, Box 111, St. John, KS 67576; Issue 48, Autumn 1996.
  • “Hurricane,” Pinehurst Journal, P.O. Box 360747, Milipitas, CA 95036; Summer 1991.
  • “Images,” Brev SpreadIssue 15, 2015.
  • “The Immigrant,” Elk River Review, 606 Coleman Ave., Athens, AL 35611-3216; Autumn 1992.
  • “Immigration,” South Florida Poetry Journal, November 2016.
  • “Immortality,” Odin‘s Eye, 301 Lee St. SW #21, Tumwater, WA 98501; 1999.
  • “In Memoriam,” Indian River Review, Issue 1, 2012.
  • “In Shadows, They Cry,” Tipton Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 804, Zionsville, IN 46077; No. 8, Fall 2007.
  • “In the End,” Gertrude, P.O. Box 83948, Portland, OR 97283; Winter 2008.
  • “In the End,” Kalyna ReviewMarch 2016.
  • “In the End,” Zuzu‘s Petals Quarterly, P.O. Box 4476, Allentown, PA 18105; Vol. 2, Special, Issues 2 & 3, November 1993.
  • “Instrument Show,” Pennine Ink, c/o Mid Pennine Arts, The Gallery Downstairs, Yorke St., Burnley BB11 1HD, UK; Issue 29, December 2007/January 2008.
  • “Intimacy,” Abbey, 5360 Fallriver Row Court, Columbia, MD 21044; 2013.
  • “The Iron Bed,” Lactuca, P.O. Box 621, Suffern, NY 10901; Issue 15, March 1992.
  • “It ain’t the same, Casey,” ZiggyZag Arms Poetry Journal, February 2017.
  • “I Was Young,” Mobius, P.O. Box 674, St. Clair Shores, MI 48080; Spring-Summer, 1995.
  • “Jennifer,” Oxygen, 535 Geary St. #1010, San Francisco, CA 94102-1633; Issue 18, February 1998.
  • “John,” Seedhouse, P.O. Box 883009, Steamboat Springs, CO 80488; September/October 2001.
  • “John on the Gridiron,” Z Miscellaneous, P.O. Box 20041, New York, NY 10028; Vol. 2, No. 3, May 1988.
  • “Johnny,” Empirical Magazine; October 2012; Year’s best edition, December 2012, available in print and eBook formats.
  • “Journey,” Veil, 4729 E. Sunrise Drive, #326, Tucson, AZ85718; Premiere Issue, October 2003.
  • “Key of G,” James River Review; P.O. Box 11454, Norfolk, VA 23517-0454; Spring 1994.
  • “Kimono,” Snow Monkey; P.O. Box 127, Edmonds, WA 98020; No. 18, 2006.
  • “Kiss Me Onward,” Protea Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 894, Pine Grove, CA 95665; Issue 2, Winter 1989.
  • “Knees,” Iodine, P.O. Box 18548, Charlotte, NC28218-0548; Fall/Winter 2005/2006.
  • “Last Date,” Leapings, 2455 Pinercrest Drive, Santa Rosa, CA 95403; Volume 3, No. 1, Spring 2001.
  • “Last Rite,” Williwaw, P.O. Box 607, Brockport, NY 14420, Vol. 2, No. 1, Winter 1989.
  • “Last Rites Revisited,” Just West of Athens; Winter/Spring 2007.
  • “Late,” Moronic Ox, September 2016.
  • “Late Night,” Stuff, 546 Clairmont Circle, Apt. 3, Decatur, GA 30033; No. 9, July 1994.
  • “Layers,” The Cannon’s Mouth, Issue 54, December 2014.
  • “Leaves,” The Autumn Sound; October 2012.
  • “Lessons,” Lonzie‘S Fried Chicken, P.O. Box 189, Lynn, North Carolina 28750; Winter/Spring 1999.
  • “Lift,” Open Cut summer broadside from Iodine, P.O. Box 18548, Charlotte, NC28218-0548; Summer 2005.
  • “Light,” Sisyphus, 8 Asticou Road, Boston, Ma 02130-3517; Sept.-Oct. 1991.
  • “Living Room Fire,” Pinehurst Journal, P.O. Box 360747, Milipitas, CA 95036; Fall 1991.
  • “Lit Club,” In Parentheses; Aug. 8 2012 web version, October 2012 print version.
  • “Lovers,” Abbey, 5360 Fallriver Row Court, Columbia, MD 21044; Issue 95, September 2002.
  • “Lump,” James River Review; P.O. Box 11454, Norfolk, VA 23517-0454; Spring 1994.
  • “Lunch,” Abbey, 5360 Fallriver Row Court, Columbia, MD 21044; No. 56, June 1988.
  • “Machine,” James River Review; P.O. Box 11454, Norfolk, VA 23517-0454; Spring 1994.
  • “Make-Believe,” Main Street Rag, P.O. Box 25331, Charlotte, NC 28229-5331; Volume 10, No. 3, Fall 2005.
  • Making Ants Pop,” Impetus, 4975 Comanche Trail, Stow, OH 44224; Jan. 1989.
  • “Manipulation”: The Subterranean Literary Journal, United Kingdom; Issue 2, October 2011.
  • “The March,” Mobius, P.O. Box 674, St. Clair Shores, MI 48080; Spring/Summer 1994.
  • “The Mark,” The Screech Owl, October 2012.
  • “Marked,” Boston Poetry, June 2013.
  • “Mattresses,” Doggerel, 1010 Mamie St., Hattiesburg, MS 39401; Issue 6, 2002.
  • “The Medic,” Cokefish, P.O. Box 683, Long Valley, NJ 07853; Volume 1, No. 7, 1990.
  • “Melodies,” Wilderness House Review, 145 Foster St., Littleton, MA 01460; No. 6.2, 2011.
  • “Metallic Wisdom,” Lactuca, P.O. Box 621, Suffern, NY 10901; #15, March 1992.
  • “Minnow,” amulet, P.O. Box 884223, San Francisco, CA 94188; January 2010.
  • “The Minotaur’s Last Meal,” The Triskelion (now defunct); No. 3, 1989.
  • “Mistakes,” Protea Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 894, Pine Grove, CA 95665; Issue 2, Winter 1989.
  • “Modern Arts,” Miller’s Pond, Fall 2015.
  • “Modern Arts,” Unrorean, Volume XIII, Issue 1, July 2013.
  • “Monkey See,” Bottomfish, De Anza College, Cupertino, CA 95014; Vol. 13, Winter 1992.
  • “Monroe,” Main Street Rag, P.O. Box 25331, Charlotte, NC 28229-5331; Volume 6, No. 2, Summer 2001.
  • “Monument,” High Altitude Poetry, a publication of the Simon Fraser University’s High Altitude Poetry Club, 888 University Drive, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada; Number 14, September 2006.
  • “Morning Fog,” The Arden, P.O. Box 326, Lafayette Hills, PA 19444; Vol. I, Issue 1, 1993.
  • “Mortality,” Thirteen Poetry Magazine, Box 392, Portlandville, NY 13834; Vol. VI, No. 4, July 1988.
  • “Mortgaged,” Moronic Ox, September 2016.
  • “Mother’s Lover,” Abbey, 5360 Fallriver Row Court, Columbia, MD 21044; No. 56, June 1988.
  • “Mother’s Lover Revised,” Abbey, 5360 Fallriver Row Court, Columbia, MD 21044; No. 100, anniversary issue, 2010.
  • “Moving,” Cellar Roots, Eastern Michigan University, 18b Goddard Hall, Ypsilanti, MI48197; Personal Pronouns issue, April 2004.
  • “Moving” (different from preceding poem); Grub Street, Towson University’s Literary & Arts Magazine, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252; 2012.
  • “Mr. A and Mike,” Grub Street, Towson University’s Literary & Arts Magazine, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252; 2011.
  • “Music,” The Contemporary Review, 2000 North Court, #12E, Fairfield, Iowa52566; July 2002.
  • “My Father’s Deer,” The Screech Owl, October 2012.
  • “My Father’s Wife,” Oasis, P.O. Box 626, Largo, FL 34649-0626; March-April 1993.
  • “Neighborhood Watch,” Omnific, Star Route, Box 21AA, Artemas, PA 17211; Issue 13, September 1992.
  • “Nesting Empty,” PoetryRepairs.com, Fall 2015.
  • “New Orleans TV, 2005,” Literature Today, Volume 2, 2015.
  • “‘Night,” Transcendent Zero PressJuly 2015.
  • “Night Beats,” Omnific, Star Route, Box 21AA, Artemas, PA 17211; Vol. II, No. 4, 1991.
  • “1963,” Lactuca, P.O. Box 621, Suffern, NY 10901; Issue 15, March 1992.
  • “No Good Thing,” The Higginsville Reader, P.O. Box 141, Three Bridges, NJ 08887-0141; Vol. 11, No. 1, Winter 2001.
  • “No, Really?” HouseboatAugust 2015.
  • “No, Really?” Writing Raw, July 2015.
  • “Not quite right,” ZiggyZag Arms Poetry Journal, February 2017.
  • “Now,” Stuff, 546 Clairmontar “Mistakes,” Protea Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 894, Pine Grove, CA 95665; Issue 2, Winter 1989.
  • “The Oddest Moments,” The Blotter, 1010 Hale Street, Durham, NC 27705; August 2008.
  • “Oddities,” echolocation, University of Toronto, Canada, Graduate English Program.; September 2011.
  • “The Odor of Dust,” The Muse, P.O. Box 45, Burlington, NC 27216-0045; Vol. 2, No. 1, July/August 1988.
  • “Of Mortal Creation,” Twisted, 22071 Pineview, Antioch, IL 60002; No. 6, 1991.
  • “Of Mortal Creation,” Dark Metre, January 2012.
  • “Oh that Conscience,” FLARE: The Flagler Review, Fall 2012.
  • “Old Cat,” The Archer, 2285, Rogers Lane, NW, Salem, OR 97304; Vol Xxxiii, No. 4, Autumn 1988.
  • “Old Friend,” Main Street Rag, P.O. Box 25331, Charlotte, NC 28229-5331; Volume 10, No. 3, Fall 2005.
  • “Old Games,” Bogg; 422 N. Cleveland St., Arlington, VA 22201; No. 60, 1988.
  • “Old Man and the Bike,” The Armchair Aesthete, available from Paul Agosto, 59 Vinal Ave., Rochester, NY 14609; Number 17, Summer/Fall 2002.
  • “One by One,” HouseboatAugust 2015.
  • “One by One,” Writing Raw, July 2015.
  • “One Moment,” Transcendent Zero Press, July 2015.
  • “One Last Caress,” The Muse, P.O. Box 45, Burlington, NC 27216-0045; Vol. 2, No. 1, July/August 1988.
  • “One of a Kind,” HouseboatAugust 2015.
  • “One of a Kind,” Writing Raw, July 2015.
  • “One Thought,” Illuminations, Dept. of English, College of Charleston, 66 George St., Charleston, SC29424-0001; 2005.
  • “On Reading Emeute to the College Girl,” Chiron Review, Rt. 2, Box 111, St. John, KS 67576; Vol. Xiii, No. 2, Summer 1994.
  • “Opportunity,” PoetryRepairs.com, Fall 2015.
  • “Over a Long Time Ago,” PoetryRepairs.com, Fall 2015.
  • “Parent/Child,” Chiron Review, Rt. 2, Box 111, St. John, KS 67576; Vol. Xiii, No. 2, Summer 1994.
  • “The Park at One,” Oak Square, P.O. 1238, Allston, MA 02134; No. 13, Late 1988.
  • “Part of Her,” Omnific, Star Route, Box 21AA, Artemas, PA 17211; Vol. II, No. 2, 1990.
  • “Parting,” Impetus, Implosion Press, 4975 Comanche Trail, Stow, OH 44224; Issue 23.
  • “Parts,” Riggwelter, April 2018, Issue 8.
  • “The Path,” Bogg; 422 N. Cleveland St., Arlington, VA 22201; No. 73/74, Summer 2007.
  • “Penney,” Empty Sink Publishing, June 2015.
  • “Pennies,” SubtleTea; March 2006.
  • “Pensacola Beach,” The Poetry Peddler, Box 250, West Monroe, NY 13167; Vol. 3, No. 2; February 1991.
  • “Playground Boy,” Pearl, 3030 E. Second St., Long Beach, CA90803; Issue 35, Summer 2006.
  • “Poet Slammed,” Busting and Droning Magazine, March 2014.
  • “The Pool Game,” Spank the Carp, 2018.
  • “Portrait,” Abbey, 5360 Fallriver Row Court, Columbia, MD 21044; Issue 84, March 1998.
  • “Possum Eyes,” River King, P.O. Box 122 Freeburg, IL 62243, Autumn 2000.
  • “Predator,” Concho River Review, Vol. 29, No. 1, Spring  2015.
  • “Prey,” Lonzie‘S Fried Chicken, P.O. Box 189, Lynn, North Carolina 28750; Issue 6, February 2001.
  • “Private Tables,” Daring Poetry Quarterly, 2020 9th St., SW, Canton, OH 44706; Summer 1986.
  • “Prosthetics,” Askew Poetry Magazine, Ventura, California; Fall 2012/Winter 2013, Issue #13.
  • “Protest,” Grub Street, Towson University’s Literary & Arts Magazine, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252; 2012.
  • “Puzzles,” The Maynard, with audio reading by the author, 2013.
  • “Quake,” The Muse, P.O. Box 45, Burlington, NC 27216-0045; Vol. 2, No. 1, July/August 1988.
  • “Quarter,” Stuff, 546 Clairmont Circle, Apt. 3, Decatur, GA 30033; No. 9, July 1994.
  • “A Question of Balance,” Impetus, 4975 Comanche Trail, Stow, OH 44224; Issue 21, January 1993.
  • “Quittin’ Time,” Chrysalis, Box 812, Holualoa, HI 96725; March 1991.
  • “Radical,” Middle Gray Magazine, March or April 2014.
  • “Rattler,” Empty Sink Publishing, Issue 4, 2014.
  • “Ready?,” The Vein Literary Magazine, October 2012, number XII.
  • “Reconnecting,” Abbey, 5360 Fallriver Row Court, Columbia, MD 21044; Issue 98, July 2003.
  • “Reconnecting,” Moronic Ox, September 2016.
  • “Recycling,” Chiron Review, Rt. 2, Box 111, St. John, KS 67576; Vol. X, Issue 2, Summer 1991.
  • “Relics,” samizdada, PO Box 8046, Austin, TX 78713; February 2, 2007.
  • “Remember, Please,” The Screech Owl, October 2012.
  • “Respect,” Tripwire, P.O. Box 5122, Seabrook, NJ 08302-3511; Number 4, 2000.
  • “Resurrection,” Exact Change Only, winter 2012-2013.
  • “Ringing Out the Old,” Tight, P.O. Box 1591, Guerneville, CA 95446; Vol. 4, Issue 1, 1993.
  • “Road,” Assisi, St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY; Fall 2011/Winter 2012 issue.
  • “Rob Ending,” Misfit Magazine, Fall 2016.
  • “Rocking,” Illuminations, Dept. of English, College of Charleston, 66 George St., Charleston, SC29424-0001; August 2002.
  • “Rocks,” In Concert, Peak Output Press, P.O. Box 325, Stacyville, IA 50476; 1989.
  • “Rows,” PoetryRepairs.com, Fall 2015.
  • “Running,” Sulphur River Literary Review; P.O. Box 402087; Austin, TX 78704-5578; Vol. Viii, No. 1, Spring 1997.
  • “Saturday,” Amelia, 329 E Street, Bakersfield, CA 93304; January 1986.
  • “Scribbles,” Limestone Circle, P.O. Box 178484, San Diego, CA 92177-8484.
  • “Sea Roar,” Onionhead Literary Quarterly, 115 N. Kentucky Ave., Lakeland, FL 33801; January 1991.
  • “Sand,” Iodine, P.O. Box 18548, Charlotte, NC28218-0548; Spring/Summer 2004.
  • “Scenes,” Miller’s Pond, Fall 2015.
  • “Scrap from an Old Notebook,” The Blotter, 1010 Hale Street, Durham, NC 27705; August 2008.
  • “Scotland,” Empty Sink Publishing, June 2015.
  • “The Second Stroke,” Coal City Review, University of Kansas, English Dept., Lawrence, KS 66045; No. 8, April 1994.
  • “Second Thoughts,” Moronic Ox, September 2016.
  • “Second Thoughts,” Nebo Literary Journal, Arkansas Technical University, Vol. 33, No. 2, Spring 2015.
  • “Seconds,” Piedmont Literary Review, P.O. Box 3656, Danville, VA 24543; Vol. Xix, No. 2, 1996.
  • “Seeking Middle Ground,” The Paper Salad Poetry Journal, 627 E. 100 S. #A, Salt Lake City, UT 84102; Vol. 2, 1992.
  • “Self-Portrait,” Backspace, 25 Riverside Ave., Gloucester, MA 01930-2552; Spring, 1997.
  • “Sentiment,” Main Channel Voices, P.O. Box 492, Winona, MN55987-0492; Vol. 1, No. 2, Spring 2005.
  • “September,” Pinehurst Journal, P.O. Box 360747, Milipitas, CA 95036; Summer 1992.
  • “Setting, Rising,” The Green Muse (defunct), Canada; July 2006.
  • “Severed,” Tight, P.O. Box 1591, Guerneville, CA 95446; Vol. 3, Issue 3, 1992.
  • “Shakes,” Conceit Magazine, P.O. Box 884223, San Francisco, CA 94188; December 2009.
  • “Shakes,” Empty Sink Publishing, June 2015.
  • “Shutterwinks,” Paisley Moon, P.O. Box 2373, Santa Cruz, CA 95063; Summer 1991.
  • “Siblings” Poetry Super Highway, March 3-8, 2015.
  • “Simplicity,” Subtle Tea; September, 2005.
  • “Sinking,” Cube Literary Magazine, P.O. Box 5165, Richmond, VA 23220; Vol. 1, No. 3, Fall 1988.
  • “Slices,” Main Channel Voices, P.O. Box 492, Winona, MN55987-0492; Winter 2006-2007.
  • “Slices Too,” Main Channel Voices, P.O. Box 492, Winona, MN55987-0492; Winter 2006-2007.
  • “Slow Fans,” Proof Rock, P.O. Box 607, Halifax, VA 24558, No. 8, Winter 1985-86.
  • “Smoke,” Abbey, 5360 Fallriver Row Court, Columbia, MD 21044; Issue 122, June 2010.
  • “Soul,” Edgz, P.O. Box 799, Ocean Park, WA98640; Issue 6, September 2003.
  • “Son,” The Schuylkill Valley Journal of the Arts, 276 West Haines St. Philadelphia, PA 19144; Spring 2004.
  • “Space,” Edgz, P.O. Box 799, Ocean Park, WA98640; Issue 6, September 2003.
  • “Spare Change,” The Poetry Peddler, Box 250, West Monroe, NY 13167; Vol. 4, Issue 6, October 1992.
  • “Special Days,” On the Rusk, Issue 4, March 2014.
  • “Specs,” Chiron Review, Issue 97, Fall 2014.
  • “Spots,” Spirits, Indiana University Northwest’s literary magazine; Indiana University Northwest, Gary, IN 46408; Spring 2010.
  • “Squoze,” Metropolis, Box 5192, Elm Grove, WI 53122; Vol. I, Issue One, Summer 1991.
  • “Stats,” The Poetry Peddler, Box 250, West Monroe, NY 13167; Volume 2, Issue 4, June 1990.
  • “Stones,” Lavender Wolves Literary Journal, June 2015.
  • “Strains,” The Blotter, 1010 Hale Street, Durham, NC 27705; August 2008.
  • “Stranger, We’ve Changed the War,” Paisley Moon, P.O. Box 2373, Santa Cruz, CA 95063; Volume II, No. 3, Summer 1991.
  • “Strangers,” Licking River Review, Northern Kentucky University, Northern Kentucky Univ., Highland Heights, KY 41099, Volume 42, 2011.
  • “Studebaker,” Poet Magazine, Box 54947, Oklahoma City, OK 73154; Summer 1991.
  • “Studebaker,” A Contemporary American SurveyThe UnitarianUniversalist Poets; Pudding House Publications, 60 N. Main St., Johnstown, OH 43031; March 1996.
  • “Style,” The Atlas Magazinepremiere issue; Sept. 1, 2012.
  • “Suburban Cow,” Boston Poetry, June 2013.”
  • “Such is a Good Man” in The Vermillion Literary Project, May 2014.
  • Suicide,” The Pointed Circle, Portland Community College, 705 N. Killingsworth, Portland, OR97217; Spring 2002.
  • “Suicide,” The Blind Man‘S Rainbow, P.O. Box 18219, Denver, CO80218-0219; Winter 2003-2004, January 2004.
  • “Suicide,” Chopper Journal, 167 Broadway #2, Norwich, CT 06360, chopperjournal@gmail.com; Issue 5, 2010.
  • “Surface Tension,” Abbey, 5360 Fallriver Row Court, Columbia, MD 21044; Issue 95, September 2002.
  • “Survival,” River King, P.O. Box 122, Freeburg, IL, 62243; Spring 2001.
  • “Symphony,” The Christian Science Monitor, March 25, 1999.
  • “Take My Hand,” Protea Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 894, Pine Grove, CA 95665; Issue 2, Winter 1989.
  • “Talking Head: Left & Right,” The New Verse News, January 23, 2014.
  • “Taxing,” Erete‘s Bloom, 2980 Cathedral Drive, Tallahassee, FL32310; Spring 2003, No. 3.
  • “Tell Me,” Zuzu‘S Petals Quarterly, P.O. Box 4476, Allentown, PA 18105; Number 8, Fall/Winter 1994.
  • “The Test,” Proof Rock, P.O. Box 607, Halifax, VA 24558, No. 8, Winter 1985-86.
  • “These Colors Run,” The Binnacle, The University of Maine at Machias; Fall 2011.
  • “This Woman,” Impetus, Implosion Press, 4975 Comanche Trail, Stow, OH 44224; No. 14, July 1988.
  • “The Third Stroke,” Chrysalis, Box 812, Holualoa, HI 96725; March 1991.
  • “Third Generation,” Sierra Nevada College Review; Sierra Nevada College Review, 999 Tahoe Blvd., Incline Village, NV89451; 2004.
  • “Thomas,” Chiron Review, Rt. 2, Box 111, St. John, KS 67576; Issue 48, Autumn 1996.
  • “Three,” The Macguffin, Schoolcraft College, 18600 Haggerty Road, Livonia, MI 48152; April, 1997.
  • “Tiddlywinks With Satan,” Mobius, P.O. Box 674, St. Clair Shores, MI 48080; Spring/Summer 1994.
  • “Time Rings,” Mobius, Orion Art Center, 115 S. Anderson, Lake Orion, MI 48035; Spring 1990.
  • “Tinfoil,” Words, Pauses, Noises, January 2015.
  • “Tires and Tumors,” Word Fountain MagazineSpring 2018, #15.
  • “To Do-Do-Do,” Magnolia Review, Volume I, Issue I, 2015.
  • “To Give A Child Choice,” Chrysalis, Box 812, Holualoa, HI 96725; March 1991.
  • “Tokyo Fabric,” The Rockford Review, 7721 Venus St., Loves Park, IL61111; Vol. XX, No. 1, Winter 2001.
  • “Tornado Season,” The Macguffin, Schoolcraft College, 18600 Haggerty Road, Livonia, MI 48152; April, 1997.
  • “Trails,” Main Street Rag, P.O. Box 25331, Charlotte, NC 28229-5331; 2007.
  • “Transplant,” HouseboatAugust 2015.
  • “Transplant,” Writing Raw, July 2015.
  • “The Tree,” Main Street Rag, P.O. Box 25331, Charlotte, NC 28229-5331; Volume 8, Number 4, Winter 2004.
  • “Trilogy In Stone,” Late Knocking, P.O. Box 336, Forest Hill, MD 21050; Vol. V, No. 1, October 1991.
  • “Trilogy In Stone,” Minnesota Ink, P.O. Box 9148, N. St. Paul, MN 55109; Vol. 13, No. 2, March/April 1992.
  • “Trinity,” Cellar Roots, 18B Goddard Hall, Ypsilanti, MI48197; September 2004.
  • “Trinity,” Leapings, 2455 Pinercrest Drive, Santa Rosa, CA 95403; Volume 2, No. 2, Summer 2000.
  • “Trinity,” U.S. 1 Worksheets, U.S. 1 Poets’ Cooperative, P.O. Box 127, Kingston, NJ08528; Volume 50, 2005.
  • “Trips,” Middle Gray Magazine, March or April 2014.
  • “Trusting B.J.,” Poet Magazine, Box 54947, Oklahoma City, OK 73154; Vol. 5, No. 1, 1993.
  • “Turtle Lawn,” Williwaw, P.O. Box 607, Brockport, NY 14420, Vol. 2, No. 1, Winter 1989.
  • Two haiku: “Western clouds” and “Baghdad shrapnel,” Kalyna ReviewMarch 2016.
  • “Two Women,” Otoliths, November 2015.
  • “Under a North Wind,” Tight, P.O. Box 1591, Guerneville, CA 95446; Vol. 4, Issue 1, 1993.
  • “Under the Banyan,” Protea Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 894, Pine Grove, CA 95665; Issue 3, Spring 1989.
  • “Under Sheets,” Tripwire, P.O. Box 5122, Seabrook, NJ 08302-3511; 2000.
  • “Unk,” Illuminations, Dept. of English, College of Charleston, 66 George St., Charleston, SC29424-0001; August 2002.
  • “Unscathed,” Prole, Prolebooks, 15 Maes-y-Dre, Abergele, Conwy, England, LL22 7HW; Issue 7, 2012.
  • “Vacation,” Exact Change Only, winter 2013.
  • “The Vapor King,” Haight Ashbury Literary Journal, 558 Joost Ave., San Francisco, CA 94127; Vol. 14, No. 1, 1995.
  • “Veil,” Conceit Magazine, P.O. Box 884223, San Francisco, CA 94188; Volume 2, Number 18, 2008.
  • “Waiting for the Post,” Slipstream, Box 2071, New Market Station, Niagra Falls, NY 14301; Vol. 9, 1989.
  • “Waiting for the Old Man,” Stuff, 546 Clairmont Circle, Apt. 3, Decatur, GA 30033; No. 9, July 1994.
  • “The Waiting Room,” Minnesota Ink, P.O. Box 9148, N. St. Paul, MN 55109; Vol. 15, No. 1, January 1994
  • “Wasn’t That a Party,” Piedmont Literary Review, P.O. Box 3656, Danville, VA 24543; Vol. 14, No. 2, 1990.
  • “Waste,” Boston Poetry, June 2013.
  • “Water,” Event Horizon Magazine, Issue 3, March 2018.
  • “Waves,” Iodine, P.O. Box 18548, Charlotte, NC28218-0548; Spring 2003.
  • “Webs,” Protea Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 876, Sutter Creek, CA 95685; Issue 5, Spring 1990.
  • “Weekly Call,” Empty Sink Publishing, Issue 4, 2014.
  • “Westworld,” The Laughing Dog, 4729 E. Sunrise Drive, #326, Tucson, AZ85718; Issue 8, Winter 2003.
  • “What Really Matters,” Chiron Review, Issue 97, Fall 2014.
  • “When a Neighbor Dies,” Red Dancefloor, P.O. Box 7392, Van Nuys, CA 91409-7392; Vol. 3, Issue 1.
  • “When Jonathan Sings,” Tipton Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 804, Zionsville, IN 46077; No. 8, Winter 2007/2008.
  • “When Hawaiian Girls are Grinning,” Blue Light Review; P.O. Box 1621, Pueblo, CO 81002; Number 13, 1990.
  • “Winter,” The Muse, Winter 2013; purchase the international collection, published in India, here.
  • “Words,” Stuff, 546 Clairmont Circle, Apt. 3, Decatur, GA 30033; No. 9, July 1994.
  • “Worms,” Paisley Moon; P.O. Box 2373, Santa Cruz, CA 95063. Issue 9, October 1990.
  • “Worth,” Protea Poetry Journal, P.O. Box 876, Sutter Creek, CA 95685; Winter 1992.
  • “Wounds,” Main Street Rag, P.O. Box 25331, Charlotte, NC 28229-5331; 2007.
  • “X-Rays,” Up Dare?, P.O. Box 100, Shartlesville, PA 19554; January 1999.
  • “Yard Sale,” The Armchair Aesthete, available from Paul Agosto, 59 Vinal Ave., Rochester, NY 14609; No. 8, 1998.
  • “Your Funeral, For Mo…again,” Curbside Review, P.O. Box 667189, Houston, TX 77266-7189; Volume 4, Issue 12, December 2003.
  • “Zen,” Askew Poetry Magazine, P.O. Box 559, Ventura, CA 93002; Issue #9, Fall/Winter 2010.

Nonfiction
[A sampling of articles…]

  • “A Clown Around Project for Fun,” Creative Crafts, P.O. Box 700, Newton, NJ 07860; Vol. 7, No. 11, Oct 1981.
  • “Adding A Machine Shop Transforms this Jobber into a One-Stop Service Center,” Eastern  Automotive Journal, P.O. Box 373, Cedarhurst, NY 11516; March/April 1981.
  • “A Florida Wholesaler Says No to Walk-in Trade,” Eastern AutomotiveJournal, P.O. Box 373, Cedarhurst, NY 11516; July/Aug 1981.
  • “Alabama Edisons,” Business Alabama Monthly Magazine, P.O. Box 66200, Mobile, AL 36660; Aug 1989.
  • “Allen’s Christian Store,” Christian Bookseller, 396 E. St. Charles Rd., Wheaton, IL 60187; Aug 1981.
  • “Aloha from Aiea,” The Pet Dealer, 567 Morris Ave., Elizabeth, NJ 07208; Nov 1983.
  • “A Primer on Painting,” Maintenance & Building Management, 287 Mokauea St., Honolulu, HI 96819; Aug 1983.
  • “Atlanta Wholesaler Prospers in Tough Market,” Beer Wholesaler, 75 SE 4th Ave., Delray Beach, FL 33444; Jan/Feb 1982.
  • “Australia’s First Naval Casualty Remains a Mystery,” Warship, Conway Maritime Press Ltd, 101 Fleet Street, London, England EC4Y 1DE; 1992.
  • “Australia’s Stake in America’s Civil War,” Naval History, US Naval Institute, Annapolis, MD 21401; Vol. 3, No. 2, Spring 1989.
  • “Back to Basics Groceries,” Business Alabama Monthly Magazine, P.O. Box 66200, Mobile, AL 36660; Feb 1989.
  • “Barn Style Increases Sales,” Western & English Fashions, 2403 Champa St., Denver, CO 80205; Oct 1980.
  • “Beyond Star Wars,” Business Alabama Monthly Magazine, P.O. Box 66200, Mobile, AL 36660; April 1989.
  • “Big Island Automotive Trades Association,” Hawaii Automotive News, 1177 Kapiolani Blvd., Suite 201, Honolulu, HI 96814; June 1984.
  • “Bonus Bucks mean extra sales,” Tack ‘N’  Togs Merchandising, P.O. Box 67, Minneapolis, MN 55440; Nov 1980.
  • “Boots, Bucks, Boost Two Stores,” Army/Navy Store & Outdoor Merchandiser, 567 Morris Ave., Elizabeth, NJ 07208; July 1981.
  • “Bryson, Inc. of Oklahoma,” Beer Wholesaler, 75 SE 4th Ave., Delray Beach, FL 33444; Jan/Feb 1982.
  • “Building the Prime Corner in Calhoun County,” Business Alabama Magazine, P.O. Box 66200, Mobile, AL; Vol. 4, No. 10, Oct 1989.
  • “Cashing in on the Tourist Trade,” Western & English Fashions, 2403 Champa St., Denver, CO 80205; May 1986.
  • “Circle H Carried Through Hard Times,” Western & English Fashions, 2403 Champa St., Denver, CO 80205; Feb 1986.
  • “Colonial Creates a Huntsville Skyline,” Business Alabama Magazine, P.O. Box 66200, Mobile, AL; Vol. 4, No. 10, Oct 1989.
  • “The Dark Side of Aloha,” Honolulu Magazine, P.O. 36 Merchant St., Honolulu, HI 96813; Vol. Xxi, No. 4, Oct 1986.
  • “Dressing Up Friends,” Western & English Fashions, 2403 Champa St., Denver, CO 80205; Feb 1987.
  • “Fort Book,” Wilson Library Bulletin, 950 University Ave., Bronx, NY 10452; Vol. 63, No. 6, Feb 1989.
  • “Growing Alabama Wholesaler Diversifies to Meet Retailers’ Needs,” Beer Wholesaler, 75 SE 4th Ave., Delray Beach, FL 33444; 4th Qtr, 1979.
  • “Hawaii Store Marches with Military Market,” Army/Navy Store & Outdoor Merchandiser, 567 Morris Ave., Elizabeth, NJ 07208; April 1983.
  • “Hawaii Wholesaler Promotes Imports,” Beer Wholesaler, 75 SE 4th Ave., Delray Beach, FL 33444; March/April 1983.
  • “Hawaii’s Country Corner: Hard Times Success in a Limited Market Area,” Western & English Fashions, 2403 Champa St., Denver, CO 80205; May 1983.
  • “Hawaiian Shop Owner Profits by Using Direct Mail Advertising,” Brake & Front End, 11 S. Forge St., Akron, OH 44309; Vol. 54, No. 1, Jan 1984.
  • “High Rolling in Huntsville,” Business Alabama Monthly Magazine, P.O. Box 66200, Mobile, AL 36660; Sept 1987.
  • “Hiking DeSoto State Park,” The Great American Outdoors, P.O. Box 10069, Huntsville, AL 35801-3670; May 1987.
  • “Horne’s Country Store,” Western & English Fashions, 2403 Champa St., Denver, CO 80205; July 1984.
  • “The Huntsville Law Rush,” Business Alabama Monthly Magazine, P.O. Box 66200, Mobile, AL 36660; May 1989.
  • “Is One Town Big Enough for Them?” Business Alabama Monthly Magazine, P.O. Box 66200, Mobile, AL 36660; April 1988.
  • “The Knockoff Pros,” Business Alabama Monthly Magazine, P.O. Box 66200, Mobile, AL 36660; March 1989.
  • “Knowledge: The Key to Triangle C,” Western & English Fashions, 2403 Champa St., Denver, CO 80205; Mar 1982.
  • “Mazy Dazy,” Kids Fashions, 210 Boylston St., Chestnut Hill, MA 02167; Sept 1983.
  • “Mobile Practice Helped This Young Doctor Keep Rolling,” Veterinary Economics, P.O. Box 13265, Edwardsville, KS 66113; Dec 1983.
  • “Mocking as a Business,” Business Alabama Monthly Magazine, P.O. Box 66200, Mobile, AL 36660; Aug 1989.
  • “Moving Management In House,” Maintenance & Building Management, 287 Mokauea St., Honolulu, HI 96819; July 1983.
  • “Neural Networking,” Ad Astra, 922 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, DC 20003; Vol. 1, No. 4, April 1989.
  • “Neural Networking,” Social Issues Resources Series, Inc., Applied Science 1989, P.O. Box 2348, Boca Raton, FL 33427-2348; 1989.
  • Numerous articles (Associate Editor, writer, photographer Aug 1983 to Aug 1986), Hawaii  Foodservice News, 470 N. Nimitz, Honolulu, HI 96817.
  • Numerous articles (Associate Editor, writer, photographer Jan 1983 to June 1986), Hawaii  Remodeling Magazine, 470 N. Nimitz, Honolulu, HI 96817.
  • “Organizing a Writers Club that Works,” The Writer, 120 Boylston St., Boston, MA 02116; July 1986.
  • “Painting in the ’80s,” Building Industry Digest, 287 Mokauea St., Honolulu, HI 96819; Aug 1983.
  • “Producing Apparel in Paradise,” Apparel Industry Magazine, 180 Allen Rd., Suite 300-S, Atlanta, GA 30328; May 1985.
  • “Promotion Places Fernandez on Honor Roll,” Play Meter, P.O. Box 24170, New Orleans, LA 70005; Vol. 9, No. 10, June 4, 1983.
  • “Quality and Appearance Boost Sales at the Perfect Touch,” Bath & Domestics, 75 SE 4th Ave., Delray Beach, FL 33444; 1st Qtr, 1980.
  • “Shirley’s Birdies,” The Pet Dealer, 567 Morris Ave., Elizabeth, NJ 07208; Oct 1985.
  • “Should Doctors Make Housecalls?,” 1988 Old Farmer’S Almanac, Yankee Publishing Inc., Dublin, NH 03444; No. 196, 1988.
  • “The Soft Touch,” Bath & Domestics, 75 SE 4th Ave., Delray Beach, FL 33444; 3rd Qtr, 1980.
  • “Sparking Revolution,” Business Alabama Monthly Magazine, P.O. Box 66200, Mobile, AL 36660; Oct 1988.
  • “Suppository,”  The Writer’s Exchange “Favorite Faux Pas,” The Writer, posted on the magazine’s website, September 2008.
  • “Staying Country in the Country,” Western & English Fashions, 2403 Champa St., Denver, CO 80205; Jan 1981.
  • “This Alabama Wholesaler Works on a First Name Basis,” Beer Wholesaler, 75 SE 4th Ave., Delray Beach, FL 33444; 2nd Qtr, 1979.
  • “Triumph’s First Postwar Roadster,” Car Collector/Car Classics, Box 28571, Atlanta, GA 30328; Vol. IV, No. 3, March 1981.
  • “Unattended Children: An Engagement Policy that Works,” Wilson Library Bulletin, 950 University Ave., Bronx, NY 10452; Vol. 62, No. 10, June 1988.
  • Various basic reading stories; Critical Vocational Reading Series, Instructional/Communications Technology, Inc., Huntington Station, NY 11746; Sets VA*A, VA*B, VA*C, 1981.
  • “Water Heating in the 1980s,” Maintenance & Building Management, 287 Mokauea St., Honolulu, HI 96819; May 1983.
  • “When One Man’s Hometown Changes,” Hometown Press, 2007 Gallatin St., Huntsville, AL 35801; March/April 1988.
  • “Yagoda: 45 Years of Success,” Beer Wholesaler, 75 SE 4th Ave., Delray Beach, FL 33444; 4th Qtr 1978.
  • “Youth and Experience Pay Off at New Orleans Beer Wholesaler,” BeerWholesaler, 75 SE 4th Ave., Delray Beach, FL 33444; Sept/Oct 1980.
 

Selected Nonfiction Periodicals

 
The Writer; Ad Astra; The Old Farmer’s Almanac; Honolulu; Business Alabama Monthly; The Wilson Library Bulletin; Alabama Magazine; Hometown Press; Hawaii Remodeling; Naval History; Freelance Writer’s Report; Hawaii Foodservice News; Hawaii Automotive News; Apparel Industry Magazine; Hawaii Real Estate Investor; Brake and Front End; Eastern Automotive Journal; Army/Navy Store & Outdoor Merchandiser; Professional Housing Management Association “Pronotes,” Kids Fashions; Tack ‘n’ Togs; Western & English Fashions; Christian Bookseller; Bath & Domestics; Beer Wholesaler; Veternarian Economics; Pet Dealer; Pet Business; Car Collector/Car Classics; Creative Crafts; Play Meter; Hawaii Maintenance & Building Management; Hawaii Building Industry Digest; Hawaii Food Show Guidebook; Social Issues Resources Series, Inc.; Critical Vocational Reading Series; Hawaii Filipino News.

 

Editing & Publishing Services

 

Put my experience to work for you!

With four decades of experience in every facet of the publishing industry—writing, editing, layout, design, finished product—I can assist you in making your current project the best it can be. If you need coaching, proofreading, detailed editing, ghostwriting, layout and design, or publication of your project, contact me to see how I can help.


Available Services

  • Writer coaching
  • Fiction and nonfiction manuscript editing
  • Book editing
  • Dissertation editing
  • Thesis editing
  • Essay editing
  • Academic editing
  • Business document editing
  • ESL editing
  • Cover creation
  • Manuscript formatting
  • eBook layout, design, formatting (Nook, Kindle, Kobo, iBooks, etc.)
  • Print book layout, design, formatting
  • Ready-to-submit electronic and print file creation
  • Indie author vendor accounts setup

Basic Services

Writer Coaching

  • Determine clear objective and goals
  • Define remedy and plan of action to overcome obstacles
  • Assist in organization, defining timeline for completion (research, first draft, revisions, completed manuscript)
  • Assist in developing clear plot, voice, tone, etc., for intended audience
  • Assist in adapting personal experience into creative process

Basic Manuscript Evaluation

The basic evaluation will assess a manuscript’s overall readability, addressing:

  • Strengths and weaknesses
  • Characterization
  • Plot structure
  • Voice
  • Dialogue
  • Action/pacing
  • Point of view
  • Overall grammatical structure

Proofreading and Editing

Proofreading

  • Grammar, spelling, punctuation

Line editing

  • Grammar, spelling, punctuation
  • Mechanics of style
  • Consistency
  • Basic manuscript formatting

In-depth book editing

  • Grammar, spelling, and punctuation
  • Mechanics of style
  • Consistency and logic (plot and characterization)
  • Dialogue
  • Manuscript standard submission formatting
  • Basic reorganization and/or rewriting of content
  • Narrative clarification  
  • Elimination of jargon and/or cliché language/phrases
  • Other non-mechanical editing as needed
  • Research (optional), writing original material, checking or correcting reading level, and/or creating/reformatting tables and figures

Rewrite editing

  • Create new manuscript from client’s rough draft, utilizing client’s research and content

Ghostwriting

  • Develop client’s idea into marketable manuscript, utilizing client’s research

Manuscript Evaluation

Basic Manuscript Evaluation

The basic evaluation will assess a manuscript’s overall readability, addressing:

  • Strengths and weaknesses
  • Characterization
  • Plot structure
  • Voice
  • Dialogue
  • Action/pacing
  • Point of view
  • Overall grammatical structure

Detailed Fiction Manuscript Critique

Evaluate and offer specific critique on strong and weak areas, with suggestions for improvement regarding:

  • Plot
  • Subplots
  • Conflict
  • Characterization and character development
  • Dialogue
  • Point of view
  • Setting
  • Mechanics (grammar, spelling, punctuation)

Detailed Nonfiction Manuscript Critique

Evaluate and offer specific critique on strong and weak areas, with suggestions for improvement regarding:

  • Organization
  • Topic development
  • Fact-checking
  • Voice
  • Indexing (optional cost at $10 per 1,000 words with manuscript evaluation, $30 per 1,000 words without evaluation)

Formatting

eBook Formatting & File Creation

  • Formats include Nook, Kindle, Kobo, iBooks, etc. (price dependent upon length of book and use of tables and/or illustrations; query for specific price quote for your project)
  • Audio iBooks creation (optional cost dependent on scope, audio source, and length)
  • Cover creation
  • Vendor account setup and publication through Amazon, B&N, Kobo, iBooks, and partnered distributors (optional service, cost dependent upon selected vendors)

Print Book Formatting & Creation

  • Cover creation
  • Full formatting (price dependent upon use of tables, illustrations, and other specialty design requirements)
  • Printer-ready formatted file
  • Optional publication and distribution through CreateSpace/Amazon (channels for worldwide distribution to online and brick-and-mortar bookstores and libraries)

Cover Design/Creation

  • Full cover design specific and unique to your book, using graphic or photographic background

Miscellaneous Services

  • Résumés
  • High school and college class essay editing: I will not research or write a class essay. That would be cheating. I will only edit to improve a paper’s appearance and readability. In some cases, I will make suggestions for further research and expansion to improve content.
  • Public relations and other business writing
  • Advertising pamphlets, booklets, and flyers, cost dependent upon project scope; includes printer-ready formatted file
  • Other services: Have a need? Let me know, and we’ll discuss possibilities.

Payment

  • Small projects, payment accepted at beginning of assignment.
  • Major projects/services, 50 percent down payment, 50 percent upon completion (payment plans available)
  • Payment via conventional check, PayPal, or (preferred) Dwolla 

Background & Qualifications

I began writing professionally in 1979 while still in college, freelancing for magazines. In 1980, I became a newspaper journalist and later moved into magazine staff writing and editing. In the late 1980s, I turned to full-time freelancing, publishing nonfiction, fiction, and poetry in regional, national, and international publications. Please click here for a publishing bibliography. Click here to open and download my press kit.

  • Nearly two dozen books published by traditional large and small publishers, including novels, poetry collections, short fiction collections, and nonfiction books 
  • Poetry and short fiction in hundreds of literary and genre magazines 
  • BA in journalism/communications, University of West Florida
  • TEFL/TESOL certification, UCLA
  • Freelance line editor, Mundania Press, 2011-2013
  • Freelance editor, Awe-Struck Books, Inc., 2005-2009
  • Freelance copyeditor, Mahogany magazine, 2000-2009
  • Private ESL tutor and editor, 1998-2004
  • Writing tutor/coach, Smarthinking Inc., 2002-2003
  • Creative writing instructor, 1993-2000, Writer’s Digest School
  • Contract writer, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, 1990
  • Writer/co-editor/photographer, Hawaii Remodeling and Foodservice News, 1983-1986
  • Public Relations Director, United Way of Escambia County Florida, 1982
  • Newspaper staff reporter/photographer, Atmore Advance, Gosport News, and Playground Daily, 1980-1982
  • Freelance writing, editing, production, 1979-present

Ready to take the first step? 

Contact me to discuss your needs and how I may help.

Put my experience to work for you.


 

Bio

Professional Background:  Chris has worked as a newspaper reporter, magazine editor, book editor, English tutor, substitute teacher, janitor, respiratory therapy technician, gas station attendant (when such things existed), salesclerk, musician in a Mexican restaurant, writing instructor, and more. After graduating college and a few stints as a daily and weekly newspaper reporter, Chris moved to Hawaii where he served as a magazine writer/photographer, both on-staff and freelance. In the mid-1980s, he turned to full-time freelance writing, specializing initially in nonfiction before transitioning primarily to fiction and poetry.

Chris’s work spans a broad spectrum—historical, musical, and social nonfiction, and dark fantasy, literary, and science fiction and poetry—appearing in hundreds of publications worldwide as diverse as Bull Spec, Main Street Rag, Slipstream, Pearl, Bogg, Chiron Review, The Year’s Best Horror Stories, Cemetery Dance, Christian Science Monitor, Honolulu Magazine, Naval History, and The Writer. His published books include Native American Flute Craft ~ Ancient to Modern, The Native American Flute ~ Myth, History, Craft, Trust Walk and Rise Up fiction collections, The Swing: Poems of Fatherhood, Big Daddy’s Fast-Past Gadget, Muscle Shoals ~ The Hit Capital’s Heyday & Beyond, Cancer, White Trash & Southern ~ Collected Poems, and Notes to My Becca.

Please visit Chris’s Author Page at Amazon.com.

Birth: 1956 in Andalusia, Alabama, City Hospital, a two-story building on East Watson Street near the intersection of South Cotton Street, built in the early 1900s, later named Covington Memorial Hospital before being abandoned in the early 1960s. The hospital’s now gone, razed, nothing remaining, not even a splinter. Chris swears he is not responsible.

Education: BA in communication arts/journalism from University of West Florida where he learned to write news articles shortly before 24/7 cable and internet “news” annihilated journalistic ethics, reliability, and professionalism.

Other Pursuits: Chris is an accomplished musician of several instruments, primarily guitar and Native American flute. He has recently produced the WindPoem series of CDs, featuring Native American flute meditations, and a musical soundtrack based on the novel Wolfshadow. Other music projects are in pre-production. His music can be licensed through Pond5.com for use in other creative projects. He also crafts Native American flutes. For more information about his flutes and music, please visit the WindPoem page.

Contact: Reach Chris through Twitter or email. After nearly three decades in Alabama, Chris, his spouse, and their daughter reside in Las Cruces, NM.

Please download his press kit for more information.

city-hospital

Home

Great stories, good music ~ no more, no less


[C.S. Fuqua] writes … with sensitivity and grace … compelling, honest. ~ Bob Keeshan, TV’s original Captain Kangaroo

Good horror … isn’t about gore but about the unexpected … Fuqua is a master of prose. I found his writing crisp, filled with details that make a story come to life. ~ Diabolical Plots

…[R]eminded me a bit of Manly Wade Wellman’s Silver John stories. I can think of no better praise than that.SFRevu

…a lasting impression on the reader.Sensawunda

Wry wit on socio-political problems …MyShelf.com

C S Fuqua handles the themes of love and death with beautiful simplicity: what else is there to life?Kalyna Review

With an eye for the particular and an ear for the music of everyday life, C. S. Fuqua shares with readers his brave and lyrical view of human experience. ~ Dr. Wendy Galgan, Editor, Assisi Literary Magazine

…a feeling of hope and the certainty that happiness and goodness are still out there. ~ Cynthia Harris, author

… gritty, insightful, humorous, tragic, and celebratory … ~ Jonathan K. Rice, Editor, Iodine Poetry Journal

Fuqua’s, then, is a mind that’s not mired in or bogged down by horror, but one that appreciates the possibilities dark fantasy provides in terms of language and ideas, symbol and emotion. ~ David Bain, author/editor

…thought-provoking and interesting … ~ Suanne Schafer, Editor, Empty Sink Publishing

… a wonderful job of creating compelling, well-drawn characters… Mike Suchcicki, author/editor/digital designer & producer

C.S. Fuqua is a first-class [Native American] flute builder and flute musician …Dick Claassen, Native American flute musician and author of numerous Native American flute instructional manuals


5-time winner Year’s Best short fiction

4-time winner Year’s Best “honorable mention” short fiction

EPIC  winner Year’s Best Poetry Collection


 


Bestsellers & more:

  • Native American Flute Craftan in-depth, workbench manual for crafting the Native American flute in all its forms, perfect for the beginner through pro levels. More information on the WindPoem  page.
  • Walking after Midnight ~ Collected Storieswith eight “year’s best” honors, has something for every reader in your life, from dark fantasy, horror, and science fiction to slipstream, southern gothic, and literary. 
  • Stream C.S. Fuqua’s WindPoem albums and Sinner’s Suite EP on Pandora and Spotify.
  • Get free downloads by signing up for the newsletter, packed with information about current and coming releases and free downloads of fiction, poetry, music, and more in every issue.
  • License Chris’s music for your projects at C.S. Fuqua ~ WindPoem
  • Check out the latest newsletter!

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Personal Experience Effect

No matter the effort to avoid it, personal experience—from the drama of relatives to political shenanigans—creeps into every writer’s work, whether it’s fiction or nonfiction. The Confederate flag hoopla and the fight for and against the rights of people of color, women, and homosexuals are examples of issues that have proved provocative, disruptive, even destructive in interpersonal relationships and a godsend for the political powers who use division as a control device. Buying into the propaganda of political and media organizations, we make extreme decisions that affect our interpersonal relationships for the rest of our lives. When those decisions involve a writer, you can bet the effects will be reflected in the writer’s work.

Politics is naturally contentious, each generation viewing its own political tomfoolery as more contentious than what came before. Since the advent of 24/7 “news” channels, whose primary purpose is not to report news, but to stoke fear, frustration, hatred, and anger, politics has been exploited fully as a tool to divide and punish rather than to find compromise and serve the common good. I’m not so naïve to believe this use of politics is something new, but its in-your-face nature has strengthened exponentially in recent decades, thanks to technology. We’re assaulted relentlessly through our televisions and radios, computers, smartphones, tablets—umbilically connected to designer “news” sites that feed our prejudice and fear to the point we lose grip on reality and rationality and strike out at all who differ in opinion, worldview, gender, sexuality, religion, lifestyle, or race.

I grew up in South Alabama and Northwest Florida during the late 1950s through the early 1970s. The region wasn’t then nor has it become one of the most tolerant of diversity. Flaming midnight crosses lit up country pastures. Robed, hooded figures gathered like kids at a mega weenie roast, singing angry, hateful campfire songs about folks born of different race or religion, preaching the end of the world was nigh if lesser races acquired the same rights whites already enjoyed. Oh, save us, Jesus! It’s Armageddon! Color me silly, but I don’t think Jesus the Jew would be welcomed at such an event.

A close relative was then and remains a man of the white robe, flames flickering in his eyes, despite his interaction over the decades with a variety of people of color and cultures, thanks to his public sales business. He has never felt a need or desire to question the region’s prevalent stereotypes and fears of people who’re different, to overcome the hatred, to grow. Why, I don’t know. To my knowledge, he’s never suffered physically, financially, or mentally due to malicious acts by any person of color. And he certainly hasn’t lost his rights to groups or individuals gaining their own. He has, however, been a willing, unquestioning consumer of the Wallace/Thurmond/Trump/Helms/Cruz/Santorum/Fox/et.al. stream of fear and hate mongering, never once seeking objective verification to even the most extraordinary claim, never once attempting to understand any issue through a viewpoint other than his own bigotry.

During a phone conversation four years ago, I voiced support for the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare. “Don’t you tell me,” he growled, “you like what that communist nigger’s done.” I wasn’t shocked by his response. We’d debated his use of such small-minded epithets on numerous occasions, especially this particular word which he uses not only in reference to anyone black, but also to persons of Middle Eastern, Mexican, and other cultural and racial backgrounds. I suspect he used the word this time simply to anger me as he began a litany of irrational charges against President Obama, that the President had “ruined” the economy, that he’s Muslim, that he’s waging war against Christians, that he’s not even American—all the batty, right-wing talking points and conspiracy theories that even reality can’t counter in the true believer’s mind. Then he asserted that the U.S. should have never pulled out of Iraq, that Obama had secured the destruction of America by doing so.

“We never should have invaded Iraq in the first place,” I said.

He took a breath. “That’s something we agree on,” he said. “We should’ve nuked the hell out of them because them A-rabs ain’t even human.”

That was it.

We were done.

After a lifetime of shared, reluctant tolerance, our relationship had abruptly come to an end.

Earlier this week, my spouse received an email from one of her relatives, an email purporting that the factual histories of the Civil War and Rebel battle flag are instead myth, that the war had little to do with slavery, that the flag is a symbol of only southern heritage, not racism. The sender did not copy me on the mail, perhaps because she understands my view of such bigotry and did not want to risk rebuttal. When my spouse replied to the mail, she copied all to whom the original had been sent, and she copied me as well, addressing the original mail as though her relative had offered it as an example of how gullible people are when something supports their bigoted worldview:

“People will believe anything rather than admitting that it’s been 150 years since the end of the Civil War and we still have racism. How sad and disappointing. As a nation we have made progress, but we still have far to go.”

A day later, the following landed in my mailbox, thanks to my spouse’s relative who hit “reply to all.” It’s presented unaltered:

“No one living today is a slave or has owned a slave, am I wrong in not liking group of people who have different views of life than I do? I have always been told ‘your rights end when they intruded on mine’ how much longer do we as Americans need to bend over and take it up the as…before these people realize they need to start to take care of themselves? This crap has been going on for years. The American public has, in my opinion done way too much to make amends for what has happened in the past and they still want more, work for it like the rest of us have done and quit asking for a hand out.”

It would have been wise not to reply to the rant, but I’m not a wise man. I thought that, by engaging the writer in a rational, fact-based discussion, he might look beyond the hyperbole of pundits, might change his mind. So I responded, copying all on the list:

“Thanks for your entertaining mail. If you would like to engage in a rational debate on specific issues, backing your points with objective, valid sources (not political organizations such as Fox News or DailyKos), I’d be happy to debate you. However, specifics are required. For example, instead of generalizations such as ‘these people,’ define whether they are black, of Mexican descent like yourself, Jewish, Middle Eastern, East Indian, Asian, etc., since the average southern white lumps all races of color into the same lesser-than category. Another example would be ‘handouts’ and the group to which the so-called handout is provided–social security, Medicare, food stamps, housing assistance, etc.–and how it affects you and how or why it is right or wrong. Back your argument with objective sources. Another example is ‘your rights end when they intrude on mine.’ Be specific. For example, do you mean you have the right to fly a Nazi flag on your property, but you don’t have the right to demand government or public entities to fly the flag on their buildings or property since that property represents all people? Or I have the right to worship the Flying Spaghetti Monster but not to force you to say my prayers in school?

“You get the idea.

“If you and the others in this mail exchange do not desire a rational debate but would prefer to vent anger and frustration over issues based on the ‘factual’ nonsense regarding the Confederate flag that began this exchange, I prefer to be left out of the loop.\

“Take care…”

A few moments later: “Fuck you.”

My response: “Okay.”

Then: “Just forget my email address and I don’t ever want to see you or any of your family again. Chris you are a looser.”

“For future reference,” I replied, “it’s ‘loser,’ not ‘looser.’”

When we refuse to engage in rational discussion, when we set our minds so rigidly based on irrational hatred and fear, when we refuse to consider another point of view unless it agrees with our own, when we refuse to grow, all of us are losers.

From fiction to poetry, creative nonfiction to straight reporting, personal experience colors my work in some way. One example of experience influencing my nonfiction work began with intervention in three on-the-street domestic violence incidents in Hawaii in the early1980s, which led to an article for Honolulu Magazine on the state’s problem of domestic violence, what police termed “local love.” The article helped in a small way to push a mandatory arrest bill through the state legislature to become law, requiring police to arrest aggressors when responding to domestic violence calls. In fiction and poetry, the above relatives, as well as others, have provided models for characters in stories such as “Side-Road Shack” and “Luau,” the novel Big Daddy’s Fast-Past Gadget, and in many of the poems in White Trash & Southern ~ Collected Poems, Volume I.

We writers are grateful to the relatives who manufacture drama, the politicians who stir the pot of fear and hatred, the citizens in our communities who fuel suspicion and discontent. By simply being who they are, these people prove an ironic benefit to writers. We thank them for helping us to explore the irrational, the hateful, the destructive through the characters they inspire. If, by chance, our work benefits the reader or society at large in any measure, we owe them that much more gratitude.

Yes, we’re deeply indebted to them.

I wish we weren’t.

Critically Speaking

Recent heinous acts by extremists, motivated by intense critical rhetoric, have set the media abuzz, with pundits defending and condemning critics for denying responsibility for their words. Critics have come a long way, applying their observations to every facet of private and public life with strident rhetoric that has elevated them to a level of prominence and power never before possessed. American journalist and satirist H.L. Mencken warned long ago that “Criticism is prejudice made plausible,” something that every writer with work to come under a critic’s damning gaze had already realized by the time of Mencken’s observation. “Asking a working writer what he thinks about critics,” English playwright John Osborne confessed, “is like asking a lamppost what it feels about dogs.”

Plato may be the one responsible for infecting society with criticism as a profession when he condemned poets and poetry in his work The Republic. Aristotle didn’t help matters with his critical counter response in Poetics. He, instead, ensured someone would write a counter-counter-response, which ensured a counter-counter-counter-response, which ensured a—well, you get the idea—until a good number of complainers figured out that, by condemning or praising someone else’s work, they could make a buck. Critics have since gnawed their way through the arts to infiltrate every aspect of life with the blather of critical analysis and condemnation twenty-four/seven.

Lucky us.

Critical analysis, whether the topic is literary, musical, political, social, or whatever, is made through and delivered from a specific person’s worldview of reality, just as this essay is written from my own personal and quite prejudiced viewpoint. The problem arises when the critic expects or, increasingly, demands that the audience accept critical analysis without question or examination, to see and judge the subject of the analysis through only the critic’s narrow viewpoint.

My book Divorced Dads: Real Stories of Facing the Challenge explored how divorced fathers in uncommon and extreme circumstances maintained close and positive relationships with their children, offering pointers and solid, productive advice to fathers in less extreme situations. The point, as detailed in the book’s foreword, was to provide perspective for divorced fathers and examples of fathers who, in uncommon challenging circumstances, maintained healthy relationships with their children, no matter the forces working against them. The intent escaped one critic who called the book the best gift a vindictive divorced woman could present to her ex-husband if she wanted to finish him off emotionally. The critic was certainly entitled to his opinion and to his inability to comprehend the book’s message, even when stated outright, but was he entitled to inflict his views on others, to mislead and prevent some fathers from improving their situation by learning from the fathers detailed in the book? Yes, he was. It wasn’t his responsibility to be honest or fair. It was the reader’s responsibility to think independently.

An extraordinary genre magazine debuted last year, featuring some up-and-coming authors whose stories proved extraordinary. Every critic reviewing the magazine admitted as much, but each felt compelled to point out something “wrong” with the magazine and/or the stories, no matter how far-reaching. While one admitted that the technique of flashback worked extremely well for a particular story, he didn’t like the technique personally and, thus, concluded the story suffered because of that. Another suggested that the premises for most of the stories were thin, sacrificed for the sake of plot and characterization. Perhaps the critic thought the same about classics that employed such thin premises as persons physically transformed into wolves by a full moon, or the presence of gravity on starships zipping through a weightless void, or impressive kabooms when death stars explode in the vacuum of space, or some alien monster uncovered after centuries under arctic ice, able to change its cell structure to match its dinner, or maybe some mad scientist whose potion turns him into Piltdown Man. Thin premises, it appears, result in extraordinarily entertaining stories, critical analyses notwithstanding.

Critics today have surpassed the danger level with their analyses, threatening to lose any ability to provide unbiased or sound guidance about their subject. The majority of today’s critics cheat, fool, berate, and belittle listeners and readers into believing and thinking as they tell us to, suggesting and even convincing us that their views, sound or warped, are our own views. We forget we have choice. We forget we have voice. We forget we are individuals.

Remember the 1976 movie Network? It accurately predicted the demise of journalism, particularly television journalism, into a clown act of entertainment, audacity, and critical extremism. Peter Finch’s character, Howard Beale, the veteran journalist who became the movie’s messiah of broadcast news, upon realization of the social harm being perpetrated by the new “news media,” urges his huge TV audience to go to their windows and scream, “I’m mad as hell, and I’m not going to take this anymore!” And he tells them to turn off TV, to turn him off, to think for themselves.

It’s time we listened to Howard Beale, even if he is a fictional character. We all benefit by turning off the critic—TV, radio, print, internet. Eliminating the relentless palaver of negativity can decrease the acts inspired by insipid and vitriolic critical rhetoric. By using our own intellect, we can better choose our entertainment, our politicians, our brand of body lotion, our cars, our futures. We can contemplate, comprehend, and decide on our own once again, defining likes and dislikes based on our personal and individual realities and worldviews, not the views of others.

At the same time, we must put the challenge to critics to tone down their rhetoric, to approach subjects calmly, rationally, to take the same advice as Thumper took in the 1942 movie Bambi: “If you can’t say something nice, don’t say nothing at all.” Or, at the very least, be constructive and respectful.

Enough said.